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Votto hampered by lingering knee problems

MLB.com @m_sheldon

CINCINNATI -- During the third inning of the Reds' 10-3 loss to the Indians on Monday, Joey Votto crushed a long double that bounced once in front of the center-field wall. The run from home plate to second base looked anything but pleasant or comfortable for the first baseman, however. Ditto for when he had to run to third base for what ended up as a foul ball.

Votto has been hurting since he was plunked near his right knee by a 96-mph fastball from Nationals reliever Ryan Madson on Aug. 4.

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CINCINNATI -- During the third inning of the Reds' 10-3 loss to the Indians on Monday, Joey Votto crushed a long double that bounced once in front of the center-field wall. The run from home plate to second base looked anything but pleasant or comfortable for the first baseman, however. Ditto for when he had to run to third base for what ended up as a foul ball.

Votto has been hurting since he was plunked near his right knee by a 96-mph fastball from Nationals reliever Ryan Madson on Aug. 4.

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"I did not expect it to take this long," Votto told MLB.com on Tuesday. "It's not anything I haven't been through or guys haven't been through before. I'm just hoping it gets better sooner than later."

Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman gave Votto four starts off -- including two full games -- since the plunking from Madson, and the 34-year-old has been getting daily treatment and trying to manage the injury. In the seventh inning Monday, Votto was taken out in a double switch with Cincinnati trailing by a wide margin.

Video: Riggleman talks about Votto's leg injury

Entering Tuesday's game, he's batted .357/.500/.429 in the six games since the injury, but Monday's double marked his lone extra-base hit. With full leg strength, it's plausible that the deep drive could have been a home run -- which would have been Votto's first since July 9.

Votto acknowledged that the injury has affected all parts of his game, which has irritated him.

"It's my legs, so it's important to have that be part of your swing," Votto said. "The thing that bothers me the most is I like being at my best defensively and being able to run the bases. I am not at 100 percent yet. I think something I take a lot of pride in is feeling and looking like an athlete, especially on the defensive end of things. I'm not a good runner, but that doesn't mean I can't be a good baserunner. I'm not the most agile defensive player, but that doesn't mean I can't perform at a really high level on the defensive end of things.

"If I don't have my legs, and I don't have the ability to move, then I am not at my very best and it affects performance. I really don't like it negatively affecting my game at all."

Video: ARI@CIN: Votto plates insurance run with RBI single

Overall this season, Votto is batting .290/.428/.428 with nine home runs and 55 RBIs. On pace for 12 homers for 2018, he's never hit fewer than 24 in a season in which he's played at least 120 games.

Votto came in having reached safely in 18 of his previous 37 plate appearances. If there isn't improvement, could he go on the disabled list for the first time since 2014?

"I hope not," Votto replied. "I don't think so. I would be surprised. I think I am getting better, we'll see."

Garrett's second-half struggles continue
When Amir Garrett gave up four earned runs after replacing Homer Bailey in the sixth inning of Monday's loss, it marked a career-high runs allowed in a relief appearance. They were also the first runs he's allowed since July 24, a span of six appearances.

But Garrett -- who leads the pitching staff with 55 appearances -- hasn't been as effective as he was in the first half. In his first 27 games of the season, he had a 1.93 ERA, but it's jumped to 7.48 in his past 28 appearances entering Tuesday.

"I don't know what the issue is," Riggleman said. "He had a couple of good appearances before last night and looked like he was back on track. Last night he made some bad pitches. He is a big, strong guy. His workload hasn't been that high.

"Early in the year, it was pointing towards that, like it was getting to be a good bit of usage, but then the usage tailed off. Sometimes we are so careful about how we use them, sometimes I think they are better when they pitch more and get through it. When we backed off of him is when he has been less effective."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Amir Garrett, Joey Votto

Inconsistent Romano exits early in loss to Tribe

MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- It's been a step forward followed by a step back lately for Sal Romano, and it was a tough night from the first pitch for the Reds right-hander in Tuesday's 8-1 loss to the Indians at Great American Ball Park.

Romano lasted just 1 2/3 innings and gave up six runs on seven hits with two walks and a strikeout. Trouble found him quickly in a 33-pitch first inning that saw the Indians plate four runs. The first five Cleveland hitters reached base -- three of them scored before the Reds recorded an out. Jose Ramirez opened the scoring with an RBI single, and Yonder Alonso followed with a two-run single of his own. Ramirez was 3-for-5 with a home run.

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CINCINNATI -- It's been a step forward followed by a step back lately for Sal Romano, and it was a tough night from the first pitch for the Reds right-hander in Tuesday's 8-1 loss to the Indians at Great American Ball Park.

Romano lasted just 1 2/3 innings and gave up six runs on seven hits with two walks and a strikeout. Trouble found him quickly in a 33-pitch first inning that saw the Indians plate four runs. The first five Cleveland hitters reached base -- three of them scored before the Reds recorded an out. Jose Ramirez opened the scoring with an RBI single, and Yonder Alonso followed with a two-run single of his own. Ramirez was 3-for-5 with a home run.

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Video: CLE@CIN: Romano gets Kluber swinging, notches 1st K

The second inning didn't bring better fortune to Romano, who gave up two more runs on two singles and a double, which prompted his early exit as Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman called for Michael Lorenzen out of the bullpen. The Indians have not been kind to Reds pitching in the first two games of this series, plating 18 runs on 28 hits.

Romano pitches well when he induces a lot of ground balls, and that was the case to a degree on Tuesday. But a lot of the balls found a hole, and Cleveland was able to string together hits. Romano fell behind in the count on 11 of the 14 hitters he faced, alongside two first-pitch hits and an 0-2 sacrifice fly from Alonso.

Video: CLE@CIN: Alonso tallies his 3rd RBI with a sac fly

"I try to go to my fastball, obviously. But that didn't work today," Romano said. "I kept missing outside or down. I really wanted to focus on trying to hit down and away against a team like this. I was struggling to do that. It doesn't really matter where you put the ball when you're behind in the count. They're looking dead-red heater."

It has been an up-and-down season for Romano, who threw six innings of one-run, two-hit baseball in a win against the Mets in his last start. The right-hander is now 7-10 on the season with a 5.31 ERA. Romano has shown signs of evolving into the pitcher the Reds think he can be -- a mainstay in the starting rotation in the next couple of years -- but has yet to find much consistency.

Video: CLE@CIN: Gennett snags grounder, starts a quick DP

"It's been like, pitch good for a couple of weeks, pitch a really, really bad one," Romano said. "There hasn't really been that mediocre game where we're still in the game, and we come back and end up winning the game. It's usually out of reach by the time I come out of the game. It's frustrating, but I know what I'm capable of. I've just got to keep getting better and go on another good run again."

Romano's first start against the Indians this season on July 10 started in a similar fashion. He gave up four runs in the first two innings, retired 12 in a row over the next four frames and made it 7 1/3 innings in a game that the Reds came back to win.

"In the previous games [in which] he's struggled, he gave up a few runs early, like against Cleveland and someone else," Riggleman said. "Then, he really found it and got the ground balls. Today he got the ground balls early, but every one of them was out of reach. I am not going to sit here and say Sal pitched great by any means, but a foot either way on about four or five of those ground balls, and he maybe gives up one or two runs."

Video: CLE@CIN: Suarez lays out, fires from one knee for out

Romano's early struggles made for an uphill battle for a Reds lineup facing Corey Kluber, one of the best pitchers in baseball. Kluber gave up a run on five hits with seven strikeouts and two walks in seven innings. The Reds were shut out through the first six innings and collected three hits. Kluber is 4-0 against the Reds in four starts and has given up six runs over 30 innings. Preston Tucker drove in the lone run on a single in Kluber's final inning, cashing in on a one-out triple from Tucker Barnhart.

Video: CLE@CIN: Barnhart legs out a triple in the 7th

The Reds bullpen did a nice job of controlling the damage after Romano's exit. Four pitchers combined to give up two runs on three hits for the final 7 1/3 innings of the game, including 4 1/3 innings from Lorenzen. The long relief appearance preserved the Cincinnati bullpen.

"Lorenzen did a great job," Riggleman said. "Mike really saved the bullpen for us. Our three right-handed relievers who normally pitch tired with a lead late in the ballgame all came in and saved our left-hander part of the bullpen. None of our left-handers had to get in that game."

Video: CLE@CIN: Iglesias strikes out the side in the 9th

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Hamilton makes tough running catch

Billy Hamilton covers more ground than most outfielders in baseball and put it on display again when he tracked down a fly ball in the gap hit by Lindor. The play was a 4-star catch per Statcast™. He had to cover 92 feet in 4.9 seconds to convert a 47 percent catch probability. The grab was his MLB-leading 14th catch of 4 or 5 stars (0-50 percent catch probability).

Video: CLE@CIN: Hamilton robs Lindor and celebrates in style

UP NEXT
The Reds finish out this three game series with Cleveland on Wednesday at 7:10 p.m. ET with Robert Stephenson on the mound. Stephenson was called up from Triple-A Louisville last week to make a start against the Mets in his first appearance with the Reds this season. The right-hander struggled with command and gave up three runs on three hits with five walks and four strikeouts in four innings and suffered a loss. Shane Bieber will be on the mound for the Indians. He is 6-2 with a 4.24 ERA on the season.

Brian Scott Rippee is a reporter for MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Michael Lorenzen, Sal Romano

Reds' best August trade involved legend

MLB.com

While the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline rightfully garners the lion's share of attention when it comes to each year's trade season, there have been numerous deals struck during the month of August that have been impactful down the stretch and in subsequent years. Here's a look at the best August trade each team has ever made:

ANGELS
Acquired: LF Justin Upton from DET
Gave up: RHP Grayson Long and a player to be named or cash
Date: Aug. 31, 2017
The Angels acquired Upton in the midst of their playoff push last season, giving the club a middle-of-the-order bat to slot behind Mike Trout in their lineup. While the Angels ultimately fell short in the American League Wild Card race, Upton posted an .887 OPS with seven home runs in 27 games before deciding to re-sign with the club on a five-year, $106 million deal during the offseason. 

While the July 31 non-waiver Trade Deadline rightfully garners the lion's share of attention when it comes to each year's trade season, there have been numerous deals struck during the month of August that have been impactful down the stretch and in subsequent years. Here's a look at the best August trade each team has ever made:

ANGELS
Acquired: LF Justin Upton from DET
Gave up: RHP Grayson Long and a player to be named or cash
Date: Aug. 31, 2017
The Angels acquired Upton in the midst of their playoff push last season, giving the club a middle-of-the-order bat to slot behind Mike Trout in their lineup. While the Angels ultimately fell short in the American League Wild Card race, Upton posted an .887 OPS with seven home runs in 27 games before deciding to re-sign with the club on a five-year, $106 million deal during the offseason. 

ASTROS
Acquired: 3B Jeff Bagwell from BOS
Gave up: RHP Larry Andersen
Date: Aug. 30, 1990
As impactful as the Astros' trade was last year to land Justin Verlander, the club's 1990 trade netted a player who would don an Astros uniform for all 15 years of his Major League career and end up in the Hall of Fame. Bagwell is the greatest slugger in Astros history, winning the 1991 National League Rookie of the Year Award and the 1994 NL Most Valuable Player Award, being named to four All-Star teams and belting 449 career home runs. The first baseman led a resurgence of baseball in Houston in the 1990s and helped take the franchise to new heights in the early 2000s.

Video: Jeff Bagwell reflects on conversation with Andersen

Andersen was a 16-year-veteran who had a 1.95 ERA in 50 appearances on the season for Houston at the time of the trade. With Bagwell, a third baseman at the time, blocked by future Hall of Famer Wade Boggs at the position, Boston made the deal for a reliever who would appear in 15 games with a 1.23 ERA. That winter, Andersen signed as a free agent with the Padres, and pitched for two seasons with San Diego before his final two seasons with the Phillies.

ATHLETICS
Acquired: SS Stephen Drew from ARI
Gave up: INF Sean Jamieson
Date: Aug. 20, 2012
The A's might have outdone themselves this year with the additions of relievers Fernando Rodney and Shawn Kelley, but their 2012 trade for Drew gave them a significant upgrade at shortstop, which was a vital piece at the time. Drew collected 16 RBIs in 39 regular-season games, then came up with four hits in 19 at-bats during the AL Division Series against the Tigers, including an RBI double in a one-run Game 4 victory that sent the series to a winner-take-all affair.

BLUE JAYS
Acquired: 3B/OF Jose Bautista from PIT
Gave up: C Robinson Diaz
Date: Aug. 21, 2008
The Blue Jays weren't expecting big things from Bautista, but they needed a temporary replacement for the injured Scott Rolen and he fit the bill. Toronto had to part only with a fringe prospect to get the deal done, and his versatility at first base, right field and second base kept Bautista on the team even after Rolen returned. Two years later, Bautista made franchise history by hitting 54 home runs in a single season, and he ultimately turned into one of the best players to ever wear the blue and white.

Video: TEX@TOR Gm5: Bautista hammers go-ahead three-run shot

BRAVES
Acquired: RHP John Smoltz from DET
Gave up: RHP Doyle Alexander
Date: Aug. 12, 1987
The Tigers won each of Alexander's 11 remaining regular-season starts and captured the American League East title in 1987; the 36-year-old would pitch two more seasons for Detroit, including an All-Star campaign in '88. Meanwhile, Smoltz was just a year removed from high school ball, but would end up constructing a Hall of Fame career as he helped the Braves win 14 consecutive division crowns and the 1995 World Series. He also won the NL Cy Young Award in 1996, and was an eight-time All Star, becoming one of the most successful postseason pitchers in baseball history with a 2.67 ERA over 41 appearances, and the 1992 NL Championship Series MVP Award. A year earlier, he tossed a six-hit shutout of the Pirates in Game 7 of the NLCS to send Atlanta to its first World Series.

Video: 1991 NLCS Gm7: Smoltz shuts the door, Braves to WS

BREWERS
Acquired: RHP Don Sutton from HOU
Gave up: Players to be named and cash (OF Kevin Bass and pitchers Frank DiPino and Mike Madden)
Date: Aug. 30, 1982
Bass went on to have a solid 14-year career but the deal was worth it to land Sutton, the future Hall of Famer who represented the final piece of the finest team in Brewers history. Sutton's shining moment for Milwaukee was the '82 regular-season finale in Baltimore, when he allowed two runs in eight innings of a must-win game opposite Orioles ace Jim Palmer. It clinched the American League East and moved the Brewers a step closer to their only World Series appearance to date.

CARDINALS
Acquired: OF Larry Walker from COL
Gave up: RHP Jason Burch, LHP Luis Martinez and LHP Chris Narveson
Date: Aug. 6, 2004
In the penultimate year of Walker's career, he accepted a trade to the Cardinals and then helped the club reach the World Series. After hitting .280/.393/.560 with 11 homers in 44 regular-season games, Walker hit six homers and slugged .707 in his second postseason appearance.

CUBS
Acquired: 1B Randall Simon from PIT
Gave up: OF Ray Sadler
Date: Aug. 17, 2003
The Cubs had made a blockbuster deal at the non-waiver Trade Deadline to get Aramis Ramirez and Kenny Lofton from the Pirates, then added Simon, who batted .282 with six home runs and 21 RBIs in 33 games. Simon provided the spark and the Cubs went 24-16 after he joined the team to win the NL Central. Simon would go on to hit .333 (8-for-24) with three doubles and a homer in the postseason.

D-BACKS
Acquired: RHP Livan Hernandez and cash from WAS
Gave up: LHP Matt Chico; RHP Garrett Mock
Date: Aug. 7, 2006
While Hernandez didn't pitch the D-backs to the postseason in 2006, he did stick around to be a valuable contributor and staff leader the following year when the D-backs won the NL West and swept the Cubs in the NLDS before losing to the Rockies in the NLCS.

DODGERS
Acquired: 1B Adrian Gonzalez, RHP Josh Beckett, OF Carl Crawford, INF Nick Punto and cash from BOS
Gave up: INF Ivan De Jesus, 1B James Loney, RHP Allen Webster, RHP Rubby De La Rosa and OF Jerry Sands
Date: Aug. 25, 2012
The word "blockbuster" is overused, but it should be defined by this nine-player trade. Guggenheim's new Dodgers ownership made a credibility statement that the tight-fisted ways of the McCourt era were over. The Dodgers never won a World Series because of it, but the veterans helped the club compete while buying time for young talent to mature. None of the prospects dealt away panned out, but Boston won a World Series anyway and dumped $262 million in salary.

GIANTS
Acquired: RHP Rick Reuschel from PIT
Gave up: RHPs Jeff Robinson and Scott Medvin
Date: Aug. 21, 1987
Reuschel stabilized the Giants' starting rotation, going 5-3 down the stretch to help San Francisco win the NL West for the first time since 1971. "Big Daddy" also finished 36-19 in the next two seasons and was the staff ace when the Giants reached the World Series in 1989.

INDIANS
Acquired: SP Mike Clevinger from LAA
Gave up: RP Vinnie Pestano
Date: Aug. 7, 2014
The Angels wanted a reliever for the stretch run, so they added Pestano and dealt Clevinger (a prospect with mechanical flaws and in the early stages of a Tommy John surgery comeback). Clevinger was a project, but he went to work with the Indians, rebuilt his delivery, broke into the Majors in '16 and is now fixture in one of baseball's best rotations. Pestano hasn't pitched in the Majors since '15, and Clevinger has a 3.59 ERA in 67 career appearances for Cleveland (54 starts).

Video: CLE@BAL: Clevinger dominates O's with two-hit shutout

MARINERS
Acquired: LF Vince Coleman from KC
Gave up: RHP Jim Converse
Date: Aug. 15, 1995
The Mariners immediately inserted the veteran speedster as their leadoff hitter for the final month and a half of their magical 1995 season, and he provided a huge spark. When Coleman was acquired by general manager Woody Woodward, Seattle was 51-50 and 12 1/2 games back in the AL West. It wound up winning the division and earning the first playoff berth in franchise history as the 33-year-old posted a .290/.335/.395 line with 16 stolen bases and 27 runs in 40 games.

MARLINS
Acquired: 1B/OF Jeff Conine from BAL
Gave up: RHP Denny Bautista, RHP Don Levinski
Date: Aug. 31, 2003
Pursuing the lone NL Wild Card spot at the time, the Marlins acquired Conine minutes before the midnight waiver deadline, with the deal completed while the veteran was on the Orioles' team plane. The Marlins were desperate for an established veteran the day after All-Star Mike Lowell broke his left hand. Conine hit five home runs and drove in 15 runs in September, and made an impact in the playoffs during the Marlins' World Series championship season.

Video: 2003 NLCS Gm5: Jeff Conine hits a solo home run

METS
Acquired: 2B Jeff Kent and a player to be named (OF Ryan Thompson) from TOR
Gave up: RHP David Cone
Date: Aug. 27, 1992
With the Mets well out of NL East contention and Cone set to become a free agent after the season, the team shipped him to the Blue Jays for Kent -- then just 24 years old. Although Kent would not develop into a National League MVP until after the Mets parted ways with him, he hit 67 of his 377 career homers over parts of five seasons in New York. Cone, meanwhile, went on to post a 2.55 ERA in eight appearances (seven starts) down the stretch for Toronto, helping the franchise win its first World Series title with a 3.22 ERA in four postseason starts.

NATIONALS
Acquired: Catcher Kurt Suzuki and cash considerations from OAK
Gave up: catcher David Freitas
Date: Aug. 3, 2012
On their way to their first postseason berth in club history, the Nats made the upgrade behind the dish for a veteran behind the plate. Suzuki would go on to bat .267/.321/.404 in 43 games with Washington down the stretch and served as the starting catcher in the postseason before he struggled at the start of the 2013 season and was traded back to Oakland.

ORIOLES
Acquired: OF Tito Landrum from STL
Gave up: Landrum was the player to be named from a deal made on June 14, 1983, in which the Orioles sent Floyd Rayford to St. Louis.
Date: Aug. 31, 1983
Landrum hit the game-winning home run for the Orioles in the final game of the 1983 ALCS in Chicago. He was such an unlikely hero that teammate John Lowenstein joked that he was not sure of Landrum's first name.

PADRES
Acquired: Brian Giles from PIT
Gave up: Jason Bay, Oliver Perez and LHP Cory Stewart
Date: Aug. 26, 2003
On the whole, this trade turned out pretty even. But there's no denying Giles' impact on the back-to-back NL West champion Padres teams in 2005 and '06. In parts of seven seasons with San Diego, Giles batted .279/.380/.435 with 83 homers. Bay would go on to have an 11-year MLB career over which he hit 222 homers, including 139 for Pittsburgh. Still, the trade helped San Diego get to the postseason in back-to-back years, and was worth the price.

PHILLIES
Acquired: RHP Jamie Moyer from SEA
Gave up: RHP Andrew Baldwin and RHP Andy Barb
Date: Aug. 19, 2006
The Phillies held a fire sale before July 31, 2006, trading Bobby Abreu, Cory Lidle, David Bell and Rheal Cormier, and designating Ryan Franklin for assignment. But afterward, the Phillies started to play well and acquired Moyer for an unexpected postseason run. They fell short in 2006, but Moyer helped the Phillies win the NL East in 2007 and the World Series in 2008.

PIRATES
Acquired: OF Jason Bay, LHP Oliver Perez and LHP Cory Stewart from SD
Gave up: OF Brian Giles
Date: Aug. 26, 2003
The deal worked out well for both sides, as Giles continued to produce in San Diego and finished ninth in NL MVP voting in 2005. But Bay was worth the price, winning the 2004 NL Rookie of the Year Award before earning two All-Star nods with Pittsburgh. Perez was also dominant in 2004 (12-10, 2.98 ERA, 239 strikeouts), and he's still pitching in the Majors as a reliever. 

Video: CHC@PIT: Bay records eight RBIs including grand slam

RANGERS
Acquired: RHP John Burkett from FLA
Gave up: RHP Rick Helling and RHP Ryan Dempster
Date: Aug. 8, 1996
This is the trade that put the Rangers over the top on their way to the first division title in franchise history. Burkett, reinforcing the rotation, threw a shutout against the Blue Jays in his first start and his biggest victory came on Sept. 21. The Rangers had lost five in a row and nine of 10 as their lead was down to one game. But Burkett pitched the Rangers to a 7-1 victory over the Angels in Anaheim to stop their skid for one of the biggest regular-season wins in franchise history. Dempster and Helling -- both prospects at the time -- went on to distinguished careers, but the price was worth it for Texas.

RAYS
Acquired: RHP Chad Bradford from BAL
Gave up: Cash
Date: Aug. 7, 2008
Bradford arrived to give the Rays a different look to their bullpen. The submariner of "Moneyball" fame appeared in 21 games and pitched to a 1.42 ERA. He made seven postseason appearances for the Rays, logging a 1.13 ERA in eight innings.

RED SOX
Acquired: INF Ivan DeJesus, 1B James Loney, RHP Allen Webster, RHP Rubby De La Rosa, and OF/1B Jerry Sands from LAD
Gave up: 1B Adrian Gonzalez, RHP Josh Beckett, OF Carl Crawford, INF Nick Punto.and cash
Date: Aug. 25, 2012
On paper, the Red Sox gave up three former All-Stars and received little in return. In reality, the club shed more than $250 million in guaranteed salary for players who were no longer performing at their prime levels. This trade is widely credited as one of the reasons for the Sox winning the World Series in 2013. General manager Ben Cherington used the newfound payroll flexibility to re-tool with free agents Mike Napoli, Shane Victorino, Koji Uehara, Ryan Dempster and David Ross. Those players fit perfectly on the field and in the clubhouse.

REDS
Acquired: 1B/manager Pete Rose from MON
Gave up: INF Tom Lawless
Date: Aug. 16, 1984
In a stunning move, the Reds brought back a hometown favorite in Rose to take on the rare role of player-manager. The deal immediately energized the Cincinnati fan base after losing seasons from 1982-84. Not only did Rose the player break Ty Cobb's all-time hits record in 1985 to great fanfare, Rose the manager was at the helm for a contender that had four straight second-place finishes from 1985-88. That helped create the foundation for the 1990 World Series title season.

ROCKIES
Acquired:RHP Jose Contreras from CWS
Gave up: Minor League RHP Brandon Hynick
Date: Aug. 31, 2009
Contreras went 1-0 with a 1.59 ERA in seven games, including two starts, and was one of two key veteran August pickups. The Rockies also picked up Jason Giambi, who had been released earlier in the month by the Athletics. Giambi hit .292 in 19 games as he and Contreras helped push the Rockies into the postseason as the NL Wild Card team.

ROYALS
Acquired: OF Josh Willingham from MIN
Gave up: Right-hander Jason Adam
Date: Aug. 11, 2014
It wasn't a blockbuster deal, but Willingham will be forever in Royals lore. He singled (his last big league hit) to spark a ninth-inning rally in the 2014 AL Wild Card game that tied the score. The Royals went on to win the game, the first off 11 straight playoff wins that year, and eventually advance to Game 7 of the 2014 World Series.

TIGERS
Acquired: OF Delmon Young from MIN
Gave up: LHP Cole Nelson, RHP Lester Oliveros
Date: Aug. 15, 2011
Young homered three times in the Tigers' 2011 ALDS win over the Yankees, then hit two more in the ALCS vs. Texas. A year later, he was named MVP of the ALCS after going 6-for-17 with two homers and six RBIs. He went 5-for-14 with a solo homer in the 2012 World Series against the Giants.

TWINS
Acquired: RHP Bert Blyleven from CLE
Gave up: INF Jay Bell, LHP Curt Wardle, OF Jim Weaver and a player to be named (RHP Rich Yett on Sept. 18, 1985)
Date: Aug. 1, 1985
The Twins reacquired future Hall of Famer Bert Blyleven in an August trade, as he had previously pitched in Minnesota from 1970-76. Blyleven made 120 starts with the Twins after the trade, including helping the franchise to its first World Series title in 1987. Bell went on to a solid 18-year career, but the Twins had Greg Gagne entrenched at shortstop at the time of the trade.

WHITE SOX
Acquired: 1B Ted Kluszewski from PIT
Gave up: Minor League IF Robert Sagers and RF/1B Harry Simpson
Date: Aug. 25, 1959
Nearing the end of his career, Kluszewski hit .297 with two home runs and 10 RBIs over 112 plate appearances and 31 games in the regular season for the AL champs. But the Big Klu hit .391 with three homers and 10 RBIs during a six-game World Series loss to the Dodgers.

YANKEES
Acquired: 3B Charlie Hayes from PIT
Gave up: RHP Chris Corn
Date: Aug. 30, 1996
Hayes rejoined the Yankees just in time for the birth of a dynasty, batting .284 in 20 games for his new team to supplement a fatigued Wade Boggs' production at the hot corner. Hayes was on the field to secure the final out of the World Series, a foul pop behind third base off the bat of the Braves' Mark Lemke. Corn never advanced past Double-A.

Video: WS1996 Gm6: Sterling, Kay call Yanks World Series win

Hamilton scales wall to give ball to fan

Billy Hamilton is known to make a dazzling catch or two -- or three. He can make a lot of amazing catches, let's put it that way. The Reds outfielder made yet another spectacular catch on Tuesday, and this time, a fan got a parting gift.

Rocky 6th inning costs Reds in loss to Indians

Bailey, Garrett surrender seven runs in frame
MLB.com @m_sheldon

CINCINNATI -- Throughout this season as Reds interim manager, Jim Riggleman has often used a quick hook on starting pitchers to get into his bullpen. But on Monday, Riggleman let Homer Bailey stick around for the sixth inning against the Indians in the Reds' 10-3 loss at Great American Ball Park.

Bailey had already navigated his way through multiple jams, survived some bad luck and never had a clean inning. After he escaped with the bases loaded in the fourth, Bailey had 90 pitches after a scoreless fifth. But Cleveland took over the game in the sixth, scoring seven runs in the frame. Pinch-hitter Yandy Diaz's RBI double off Bailey provided the go-ahead run in a 2-2 game.

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CINCINNATI -- Throughout this season as Reds interim manager, Jim Riggleman has often used a quick hook on starting pitchers to get into his bullpen. But on Monday, Riggleman let Homer Bailey stick around for the sixth inning against the Indians in the Reds' 10-3 loss at Great American Ball Park.

Bailey had already navigated his way through multiple jams, survived some bad luck and never had a clean inning. After he escaped with the bases loaded in the fourth, Bailey had 90 pitches after a scoreless fifth. But Cleveland took over the game in the sixth, scoring seven runs in the frame. Pinch-hitter Yandy Diaz's RBI double off Bailey provided the go-ahead run in a 2-2 game.

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"Ninety is nothing. He was throwing the ball good," Riggleman said. "Their pinch-hitter, the young guy, had a good at-bat for them. We tried to calm it down. The floodgates opened."

The sixth-inning trouble began when Greg Allen hit a one-out single to left field and stole second base. In a full count, Diaz followed with his pinch-hit RBI double off the left-field wall. Next came an intentional walk to Francisco Lindor before Riggleman removed Bailey in favor of lefty Amir Garrett.

"The last inning is the one that really got me. The ball kind of came out of my hand bad there on a 3-2 count [to Diaz]," Bailey said.

Garrett took over and could not snuff out the rally. Michael Brantley promptly launched an RBI double to right field. With the bases loaded and two outs, Melky Cabrera lined a two-run single to center field and Jason Kipnis drove a long double over Mason Williams' head in center field. Yan Gomes' RBI double punctuated the inning and made it a 9-2 game. The four runs allowed by Garrett were a career high for a relief appearance.

Bailey finished with five earned runs and 10 hits allowed over 5 1/3 innings with two walks (one intentional) and five strikeouts. Six of the hits came when he had two strikes on hitters.

"They put maybe solid contact on some of them," Bailey said. "Some of them just happened to find that hole. And I saw a lot of defensive swings that still made hits. They had a few very solid doubles too."

After Bailey had a 2.45 ERA over his first two strong starts in his return from the disabled list, he's now fared poorly in back-to-back games, with 10 earned runs and 21 hits over 8 2/3 innings.

One of the balls that found a hole came in the third inning with a 1-0 Reds lead. Brantley hit a single on the ground that snuck through the middle to set things up for Jose Ramirez. He pulled a 1-2 pitch that landed just inside the foul pole -- and just out of Phillip Ervin's reach -- for a two-run homer, his 35th.

"I wanted to come back in for a punchout. How he kept the ball fair, I don't know," Bailey said. "It's a little short down the lines. That guy is having a great season. When you're having that kind of a season, that's the stuff you do."

The fourth inning was fraught with trouble. A potential double-play grounder from Gomes was misplayed by shortstop Jose Peraza for an error that left everyone safe. Bailey then got crossed up with catcher Tucker Barnhart and stopped mid-windup for a balk call. A two-out walk to Lindor loaded the bases, but Bailey got Brantley to ground out and escape the danger.

"I don't remember the last time I balked," Bailey said. "As soon as I lifted my leg, I saw Tucker on the side of the plate that I didn't know he was going to be. That's just 100 percent on me. We were able to get through that inning and just keep making pitches."

Despite the outcome, Riggleman came away pleased with how Bailey pitched.

"I thought Homer really battled through some adversity," Riggleman said. "We made him throw a lot of extra pitches. He did a good job. He got charged with some runs there at the end. He really threw the ball good."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Home run No. 18 for Gennett: Leading off the fifth inning against Cleveland starter Mike Clevinger, Scooter Gennett hit a 1-1 pitch for a homer to right field to make it a 2-2 game, but Cleveland's big rally erased any thoughts of it being a close game into the late innings. The Reds had chances to do more vs. Clevinger, who gave up six walks in his five innings.

Video: CLE@CIN: Gennett crushes a solo home run to RF in 5th

"Clevinger made the necessary pitches to get out of trouble," Riggleman said. "The game [had a] widespread margin, but was closer than the score indicates. But it's a loss nonetheless."

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
The blowout had the Reds use four relief pitchers, but in a move toward bullpen preservation, Riggleman made an interesting decision in the ninth when he had right fielder Brandon Dixon move to the mound and pitch. Reliever Michael Lorenzen entered the game in right field for the first time in his pro career. Dixon pitched a 1-2-3 inning with one strikeout.

Video: CLE@CIN: Dixon sends Ramirez's bat flying on K in 9th

Riggleman didn't want Lorenzen to pitch after he worked an inning on Sunday vs. Arizona. He was also trying to avoid using Raisel Iglesias, Jared Hughes or David Hernandez

"If we had made it 10-5, I was going to have Lorenzen pitch. Once it stayed 10-3, we made that decision," Riggleman said.

Dixon was the fourth different Reds position player to pitch this season.

UP NEXT
Sal Romano is scheduled to pitch when the Reds meet the Indians at 7:10 p.m. ET on Tuesday at Great American Ball Park. Romano is coming off of a very strong six-inning performance in a 6-1 win over the Mets last Tuesday, where he gave up one earned run and only two hits with three walks and five strikeouts. He will be opposed by Cleveland's Corey Kluber, who is 3-0 with a 1.96 ERA in three career starts vs. Cincinnati.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Reds' nicknames for Players' Weekend

MLB.com

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Shop for Players' Weekend gear
2018 Players' Weekend nicknames
Best nickname for every team
All you need to know about Players' Weekend

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Shop for Players' Weekend gear
2018 Players' Weekend nicknames
Best nickname for every team
All you need to know about Players' Weekend

Video: Get ready, 2018 Players' Weekend is August 24-26

Here are the nicknames big leaguers will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

:: Players' Weekend presented by Valspar Stain ::

Homer Bailey: "HOMER"
Tucker Barnhart: "BARNEY"
Alex Blandino: "BLANDY"
Curt Casali: "CAS"
Luis Castillo: "LA PIEDRA"
Rookie Davis: "BILL"
Anthony DeSclafani: "DISCO"
Brandon Dixon: "B DIX"
Phillip Ervin: "MAGIC"
Amir Garrett: "AG"
Scooter Gennett: "DAL3"
Billy Hamilton: "BONE"
Matt Harvey: "HARV"
David Hernandez: "D HERN"
Dilson Herrera: "DILLY"
Jared Hughes: "ROBOT"
Raisel Iglesias: "EL CICLON"
Michael Lorenzen: "ZEN MASTER"
Keury Mella: "MANINI"
Wandy Peralta: "LA GRASA"
Jose Peraza: "EL LLANERO"
Sal Romano: "BIG SALLY"
Scott Schebler: "SHEB"
Jackson Stephens: "JACKO"
Robert Stephenson: "BOB"
Eugenio Suarez: "NICOLLE"
Preston Tucker: "TUCK"
Joey Votto: "IN FLANDERS FIELDS"
Mason Williams: "MASE"
Jesse Winker: "WINK"

Cincinnati Reds

Dixon fools J-Ram with nasty offspeed pitch

Brandon Dixon has done it all for the Reds this season. He's played first base, right field, left field, second base and third base, but hadn't taken the mound to play the role of a pitcher ... until Monday night's 10-3 loss to the Indians at Great American Ball Park. 

With Cleveland leading in the ninth inning, 10-3, Reds manager Jim Riggleman brought in Dixon for his first pitching appearance, and he was up to the task -- retiring Francisco Lindor on popup, Michael Brantley on a flyout and striking out Jose Ramirez, who at the time was 3-for-4 with a homer on the night. And he did it on three pitches.

Reds promote Reed for bullpen depth

Mella optioned to Triple-A Louisville in corresponding move
MLB.com @m_sheldon

CINCINNATI -- Left-handed pitcher Cody Reed has been on a very good stretch of starts for Triple-A Louisville lately -- 2-0 with a 1.38 ERA over his last four starts -- but there is no vacancy in a Reds big league rotation that is already brimming with six starters.

But Reed found himself back in the Majors again on Monday, recalled from Louisville to be available from the bullpen. Keury Mella was optioned to Louisville as the corresponding move after he threw 47 pitches in two innings Sunday and allowing three home runs in a 9-2 loss to Arizona.

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CINCINNATI -- Left-handed pitcher Cody Reed has been on a very good stretch of starts for Triple-A Louisville lately -- 2-0 with a 1.38 ERA over his last four starts -- but there is no vacancy in a Reds big league rotation that is already brimming with six starters.

But Reed found himself back in the Majors again on Monday, recalled from Louisville to be available from the bullpen. Keury Mella was optioned to Louisville as the corresponding move after he threw 47 pitches in two innings Sunday and allowing three home runs in a 9-2 loss to Arizona.

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Reed was not disappointed that he wasn't brought up to start games.

"I'm in the big leagues now, so it's not frustrating," Reed said. "Last time I was here for a couple of hours, so hopefully it's a little longer than that. Whatever role they want me to be in, I don't care as long as I'm up here."

Reed was on the Opening Day roster as a reliever and went back to Louisville in April. On July 4, he was called up to be long-relief insurance the day after an extra-inning game but was not used and went right back down. Monday was his scheduled day to start for Louisville.

This time however, indications are that Reed will get a chance to stick around.

"I think this time he should feel like he doesn't have to go in there and dominate to stay," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said. "We just want to give him a long look."

In 18 games (17 starts) overall for Louisville this season, Reed is 4-8 with a 3.92 ERA and 1.33 WHIP over 105 2/3 innings. He's allowed 31 walks while striking out 105. He has yet to put it all together for the big league club, going 1-8 with a 6.65 ERA in 26 games, including 12 starts, over parts of the past three seasons.

"He is another guy we have to continue to get information on moving forward," Riggleman said. "We feel like he can be another significant part of this ballclub in the future. He is young, but it is not like he is 21. It is time for him to come in and solidify a spot on the ballclub."

Three starts ago for Louisville, Reed pitched 7 2/3 innings and struck out nine and then followed that outing with 8 2/3 innings and 10 strikeouts. During his previous callup, he cited improved confidence and better mental attitude for his success. That remains one of his strengths over a month later.

"I like having the ball in the seventh inning. It feels good," Reed said. "I haven't made any adjustments really with my stuff or grips. I'm just really starting to trust it, going out there knowing that I'm better than the guy that's got a bat in his hand. That automatically has some sort of advantage in my favor. I'm just acting like I've got nothing to lose. It's helped me so far, especially with going deep in the game."

Schebler feels good after throwing
For the first time since his rehab assignment at Louisville was cut short because of persistent right shoulder soreness on Friday, Reds outfielder Scott Schebler resumed a throwing program. With third-base coach Billy Hatcher catching for him on the field at Great American Ball Park, Schebler made approximately 40 throws from a distance of 90 feet.

Video: CLE@CIN: Reds booth gives update on Schebler's injury

"I could actually throw it down at his waist, I could throw it down at his knees," Schebler said. "That's a good indication. It's just like pitching, when people get tired or you're hurt, you're throwing the ball up in the zone. Being able to finish throws and throw it down, kind of at his waist level, that was good, that was really good for a first day."

Schebler would likely resume his rehab assignment for a few games before the Reds activate him from the disabled list. He's been out since spraining the AC joint in his right shoulder from a crash into the wall on July 14 at St. Louis.

Video: CIN@STL: Schebler gets injured on a catch at the wall

Most importantly, Schebler felt no pain or discomfort during or after throwing.

"Yeah, big breakthrough. No pain is really nice," Schebler said. "I'm excited to get back at this point. I'm not sure exactly the schedule as far as going forward, but I'm assuming it'll be pretty quick, now that there's no pain."

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds, Cody Reed

HRs prove costly for Castillo as Reds drop finale

Cincinnati surrenders five home runs vs. D-backs
MLB.com @m_sheldon

CINCINNATI -- The difference between an exemplary Sunday afternoon vs. the D-backs and a losing performance for Reds starter Luis Castillo proved to be two fastballs over the plate. Castillo allowed a three-run home run in the first inning and a two-run homer in the sixth, accounting for the five earned runs he gave up during a 9-2 Reds loss to Arizona at Great American Ball Park to prevent a three-game series sweep.

Castillo lasted 5 2/3 innings with five hits, one walk and seven strikeouts.

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CINCINNATI -- The difference between an exemplary Sunday afternoon vs. the D-backs and a losing performance for Reds starter Luis Castillo proved to be two fastballs over the plate. Castillo allowed a three-run home run in the first inning and a two-run homer in the sixth, accounting for the five earned runs he gave up during a 9-2 Reds loss to Arizona at Great American Ball Park to prevent a three-game series sweep.

Castillo lasted 5 2/3 innings with five hits, one walk and seven strikeouts.

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"Everything Luis did between the first and sixth was real sharp," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said.

Video: ARI@CIN: Castillo fields grounder to retire Pollock

A leadoff single and a one-out walk in the first inning preceded Castillo striking out A.J. Pollock for the second out. He was one strike from getting out of the jam, but an 0-2, 96-mph four-seam fastball to Daniel Descalso caught the middle of the plate and the lefty hitter knew just what to do.

Descalso drove the pitch to the batter's eye in center field for a three-run homer and a quick 3-0 Arizona lead. Castillo knew he made a mistake.

"It was supposed to be an inside pitch. I missed over the plate and he took advantage of it," Castillo said via translator Julio Morillo. "Sometimes when you're ahead in the count, you want to make that perfect pitch. You want to make that secondary stuff look perfect. I think that's when you get hurt a lot, instead of only just throwing the pitch. That's normal. Trying to make that pitch perfect is when you miss over the plate and get hurt like that."

Castillo retired 13 in a row after the Descalso homer and seemed poised for a deep outing until Jon Jay led off the sixth with a single that rolled past third baseman Eugenio Suarez. Next was Paul Goldschmidt, who drove an 0-1 fastball -- also 96 mph -- to the opposite field for a two-run homer into the right-field seats to give the D-backs a 5-2 lead.

"I made my pitch there. It was supposed to be inside," Castillo said. "It was inside, but he's a strong man and he just put a good swing on it inside the ball and hit a homer."

A two-out double by Descalso in the sixth inning brought Riggleman from the dugout and that was all for Castillo's afternoon.

Castillo, 25, is 6-10 with a 5.04 ERA in 24 starts this season. Two outings ago vs. the Phillies, he threw seven scoreless innings. Much like that start, he was changing speeds to good effect vs. Arizona. In the third inning after he struck out Jay with a 95-mph fastball, Castillo was able to also strike out Goldschmidt with an 85-mph changeup. In the fourth inning, after a first-pitch fastball to Descalso was called a ball, Castillo returned with three straight secondary pitches before getting the strikeout on a changeup.

"After the first home run, I was cruising," Castillo said. "I was throwing really good. But that thing happens and it's part of the game."

Castillo is tied for second in the National League with 22 home runs allowed. He's slightly ahead of teammates Tyler Mahle and Sal Romano -- both have 21 while Matt Harvey has given up 20.

"Lately it seems like we've been giving up fewer, we were giving them up at a record rate not two or three weeks ago," Riggleman said of the home runs. "That's kind of calmed down a little bit. Today we gave them up a little bit. Luis' performance, after the first inning, really after Descalso's homer, then right through to the fly ball that Goldschmidt hit out, he really threw the ball well. The score was 3-2 before Goldschmidt's home run to right field, we're in the ballgame, he's keeping us in the game. Then it's 5-2, it's going to be a little tougher. We can still come back from 5-2. We just needed to keep it there and see if we can get it back."

Thoughts of a comeback were wiped out in the four-run top of the ninth. Keury Mella was finishing the game on the mound for the Reds when he gave up three home runs -- a two-run shot to right field by Eduardo Escobar with one out -- and back-to-back two-out solo drives by Goldschmidt and David Peralta.

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Reds get on the board: The Reds didn't get too many chances to hurt Arizona starter Zack Godley, who pitched 6 2/3 innings. They caught a break in the bottom of the second on a potential inning-ending double play grounder to first base by Preston Tucker. After the force play was made at second base, Godley covered the bag but didn't catch the throw from Nick Ahmed and was charged with an error which allowed Suarez to score to make it a 3-1 game.

Video: ARI@CIN: Suarez scores from second on an error

SOUND SMART
In the third inning after a Jose Peraza one-out triple, Joey Votto drove him in with a sacrifice fly to center field that made it a 3-2 game. It was the 885th career RBI for Votto, which is eighth on the club's all-time list. It put him one behind seventh place's Ted Kluszewski and his 886 RBIs.

Video: ARI@CIN: Votto plates Peraza with a sacrifice fly

UP NEXT
Another first-place team visits Great American Ball Park when the Reds host the Indians for the first of three games at 7:10 p.m. ET on Monday. Homer Bailey will start for Cincinnati against Cleveland's Mike Clevinger. Bailey lasted only 3 1/3 innings in a 6-4 loss to the Mets in his last start.

Mark Sheldon has covered the Reds for MLB.com since 2006, and previously covered the Twins from 2001-05. Follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast.

Cincinnati Reds

Each team's jersey number likely to be retired next

MLB.com @williamfleitch

Over the weekend, the Giants retired the No. 25 worn by Barry Bonds and the Tigers retired Jack Morris' No. 47. Bonds became the 12th Giant and Morris the seventh Tiger so honored (along with Jackie Robinson's No. 42 for both teams, of course). Bonds played for the Giants for 15 seasons and Morris pitched for the Tigers for 14 years and was just inducted into the Hall of Fame: It was a no-brainer for the Tigers once he was in.

This whole exercise got us thinking: Which active players might end up with their own jerseys retired? Who potentially has that immortality in their future? Thus, this week at The Thirty, in honor of Bonds and Morris, we take a look at the most likely active player to someday have their number retired for every team. Note the wording there, by the way: The player has to be active, but he does not have to be actively playing for the team that will retire his number at this specific moment.

Over the weekend, the Giants retired the No. 25 worn by Barry Bonds and the Tigers retired Jack Morris' No. 47. Bonds became the 12th Giant and Morris the seventh Tiger so honored (along with Jackie Robinson's No. 42 for both teams, of course). Bonds played for the Giants for 15 seasons and Morris pitched for the Tigers for 14 years and was just inducted into the Hall of Fame: It was a no-brainer for the Tigers once he was in.

This whole exercise got us thinking: Which active players might end up with their own jerseys retired? Who potentially has that immortality in their future? Thus, this week at The Thirty, in honor of Bonds and Morris, we take a look at the most likely active player to someday have their number retired for every team. Note the wording there, by the way: The player has to be active, but he does not have to be actively playing for the team that will retire his number at this specific moment.

Now, some of these teams have a rule that they won't retire anyone's number who wasn't elected to the Hall of Fame. In this case, if there is no obvious Hall of Fame candidate, when necessary, we'll pick the player most likely to be inducted into the team's Hall of Fame. But the general principle remains: Who's the active player most likely to go down in history for each specific franchise? Here's our list.

AMERICAN LEAGUE EAST

Blue Jays
19: Jose Bautista

This is probably the last year for Bautista, who is peddling his wares for the Mets, his second team this season. This jersey retirement probably won't end up happening, so they may just have to do a statue of his bat flip.

Video: MLB Tonight uses Statcast™ on Bautista's bat flip

Orioles
10: Adam Jones

Jones may be traded in August, but he'll be forever an Oriole. He's Captain America for crying out loud.

Rays
3: Evan Longoria

He's the best player in franchise history by a wide, wide margin.

Red Sox
15: Dustin Pedroia

Pedroia is already one of the franchise's 10 best players by WAR (per Baseball Reference) in history, and if he ever gets healthy again, he'll pass David Ortiz (whose No. 34 is already retired) in a matter of weeks. Also, those two World Series championships don't hurt.

Video: 2007 WS Gm1: Dustin Pedroia leads off with homer
Yankees
99: Aaron Judge

It's obviously early, but it's not like anyone else is clamoring for the number.

AL CENTRAL

Indians
12: Francisco Lindor

This is a tough call: Corey Kluber (28) is right there, too, but Lindor could be here for decades to come as a franchise icon.

Royals
13: Salvador Perez

Anybody else get the feeling that come 2028 we're going to be having the same Hall of Fame arguments about Perez that we're having about Yadier Molina right now?

Video: Perez receives World Series MVP Award in presentation

Tigers
24: Miguel Cabrera

Cabrera will end up having been a Tiger for 16 years by the time his contract is over … and heck, maybe even longer.

Video: WS2012 Gm3: Miggy receives trophy for Triple Crown

Twins
7: Joe Mauer

Remember, Kent Hrbek has a statue outside Target Field. If he has a statue, they should probably just name the stadium after Mauer.

White Sox
49: Chris Sale

Probably pushing it here, but if he ends up spending longer than seven years -- the amount of time he spent with the White Sox -- with any other team, we'll be surprised.

AL WEST

Angels
27: Mike Trout

Sorry, Vlad.

Astros
27: Jose Altuve

The jersey might be retired before the player is.

Video: Watch Jose Altuve's top 10 moments of the 2017 season

Athletics
26: Matt Chapman

Without question the toughest call on the board, but we'll just imagine a theoretical future where he turns into Brooks Robinson and plays with the A's for the next 15 years.

Mariners
51: Ichiro Suzuki

He's not technically retired yet, remember.

Video: A look at Ichiro's first and last hits in the Majors

Rangers
29: Adrian Beltre

If only he could have won one of those World Series…

NATIONAL LEAGUE EAST

Braves
5: Freddie Freeman

He's still only 28 years old. The guy the Braves didn't trade years ago may end up being an Atlanta lifer … and perhaps someday a champion.

Marlins
27: Giancarlo Stanton

He's the Marlins' all-time leader in bWAR, by a significant margin. But by the time he retires, will anyone remember he ever played here?

Video: Stanton caps off historic 2017 with NL MVP Award

Mets
5: David Wright

Oh, what could have been.

Nationals
31: Max Scherzer

He's under contract with the Nationals through 2021, which gives him a lot of time to win some more Cy Young Awards.

Video: BOS@WSH: Scherzer records 1,000th K with Nationals

Phillies
26: Chase Utley

We've got five years to debate his Hall of Fame case. OK, probably 10, at least.

NL CENTRAL

Brewers
8: Ryan Braun

Is this crazy? This is probably crazy. But we might feel a lot differently about Braun's offense in 20 years than we do now.

Cardinals
5: Albert Pujols

Molina might end up having his jersey retired as well, but the Cardinals haven't given out No. 5 since Pujols left and surely won't ever again.

Video: WS2011 Gm3: Pujols' trio of homers ties Series record

Cubs
17: Kris Bryant

Incredibly tough call between Bryant and Anthony Rizzo here, but we'll go with the guy with the MVP Award and maybe some more coming.

Video: Bryant continues magical year with NL MVP Award

Pirates
22: Andrew McCutchen

Still pretty strange that his old team has a better record than his new one does.

Reds
19: Joey Votto

At this point, Votto will probably retire a Red, and maybe as the best Red since the Big Red Machine.

NL WEST

D-backs
44: Paul Goldschmidt

Goldschmidt might have gotten started too late in his career to have much of a shot at the Hall of Fame, but he'll be beloved in Phoenix forever.

Dodgers
22: Clayton Kershaw

We'll see what happens this offseason, but 11 years of brilliance so far is plenty.

Video: Kershaw sets Dodgers, MLB record with strikeout mark

Giants
28: Buster Posey

Barely edging out Madison Bumgarner, if just because Posey is less likely to ever play anywhere else.

Padres
23: Fernando Tatis Jr.

Heck, why not?

Rockies
28: Nolan Arenado

The question, as with many Rockies: How long will he remain a Rockie?

Video: Must C Cycle: Arenado gets cycle with walk-off homer

Will Leitch is a columnist for MLB.com.

Reds fans deal with D-backs HR balls differently

The D-backs hit a bunch of dingers on Sunday -- five, to be exact -- in their 9-2 win over the Reds. Unfortunately, the game was at Great American Ball Park, so the dingers were not as appreciated as they would've been at Chase Field. 

Two of the homers in question, one by Paul Goldschmidt and another by Eduardo Escobar, got fan reactions that presented us with the age-old controversial question: What should fans do with opposing player home run balls?

Harvey does it all before Reds rally late for win

Righty K's 7 in 7 innings, hits RBI single; Cincinnati scores 4 runs in 8th
Special to MLB.com

CINCINNATI -- Another night, another standout showing from a Reds starting pitcher. And thanks to an eighth-inning offensive onslaught Saturday, the Reds earned a second straight win over the D-backs, prevailing 6-3.

After the D-backs broke through against the Reds' bullpen in the top of the eighth to take a brief lead and potentially spoil Matt Harvey's splendid effort, Tucker Barnhart's pinch-hit, two-run double in the bottom of the eighth kickstarted a four-run frame, turning a one-run deficit into a three-run advantage at Great American Ball Park.

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CINCINNATI -- Another night, another standout showing from a Reds starting pitcher. And thanks to an eighth-inning offensive onslaught Saturday, the Reds earned a second straight win over the D-backs, prevailing 6-3.

After the D-backs broke through against the Reds' bullpen in the top of the eighth to take a brief lead and potentially spoil Matt Harvey's splendid effort, Tucker Barnhart's pinch-hit, two-run double in the bottom of the eighth kickstarted a four-run frame, turning a one-run deficit into a three-run advantage at Great American Ball Park.

View Full Game Coverage

Friday night, Anthony DeSclafani blanked the D-backs over seven innings in a 3-0 Reds win. Harvey was nearly as strong, delivering seven innings of two-run ball, striking out seven and issuing just one walk among five hits. The righty exited with the game tied at 2, before David Peralta's tie-breaking solo home run off former D-backs reliever David Hernandez.

Barnhart, though, came through as a pinch-hitter, plating Eugenio Suarez and Curt Casali with a double off Archie Bradley. Billy Hamilton and Joey Votto followed with RBI singles off T.J. McFarland.

Video: ARI@CIN: Hamilton plates Barnhart with single to CF

"He's a damn good pitcher. I got him tonight," Barnhart said of Bradley, who entered with 54 strikeouts in 54 innings. "I'm sure he's going to get me 20 more times, for sure."

Votto dealing with right leg soreness

Harvey's seven innings pitched were his longest outing as a Red since joining the club on May 8, and it was his first time pitching seven innings since April 21, 2017, with the Mets. Harvey, a candidate to be moved before the Aug. 31 waiver deadline, had struggled in his previous three starts, surrendering 15 earned runs and 23 hits over his last 12 2/3 innings pitched.

"Last thing you want to do is go out in the seventh and not do your job," Harvey said. "To get that done, that was huge."

Video: Reds on pitching, comeback in win

Harvey evaded potential damage in the first inning after rain caused a 40-minute delay to the proceedings. The righty retired the first two batters, the latter on a leaping catch into the left-center-field wall by Hamilton, before yielding a single to A.J. Pollock and a walk to Eduardo Escobar. However, Harvey struck out Steven Souza Jr. looking to quell the threat, the first of seven straight D-backs retired by Harvey.

Video: ARI@CIN: Harvey strikes out Souza to end early threat

"The deeper [Harvey] went into the game, the better he got. We've seen him do that quite often," Reds interim manager Jim Riggleman said.

The D-backs did strike first, however, with Escobar's first home run with Arizona also plating Pollock in the top of the fourth. The Reds leveled the score in the bottom of the frame, though. Phillip Ervin's RBI double scored Suarez from first before Harvey's two-out single to shallow right field scored Ervin. It was Harvey's first hit with the Reds in 35 plate appearances.

Video: ARI@CIN: Ervin brings home Suarez with double to LF

After Peralta's home run, Hernandez and Amir Garrett escaped further damage in the eighth before Raisel Iglesias pitched a 1-2-3 ninth for his 23rd save.

Video: ARI@CIN: Iglesias strikes out Ahmed to nail down save

MOMENT THAT MATTERED
Barnhart's well-timed bash: Barnhart, the Reds' regular catcher, had the night off before Riggleman summoned him to face Bradley with runners at first and second with two outs and the Reds trailing 3-2 in the bottom of the eighth. Barnhart worked a full count before lining a 96-mph fastball -- the seventh pitch he saw -- into the left-center-field gap for the go-ahead double.

Video: ARI@CIN: Barnhart delivers PH go-ahead 2-run double

SOUND SMART
Harvey's game-tying base hit in the fourth inning was not only his first hit as a Red, it was the first hit by a Reds pitcher other than DeSclafani since Tyler Mahle's bunt single on June 30.

Video: ARI@CIN: Harvey pokes RBI single for 1st Reds hit

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Hamilton showed no ill effects from the rain delay prior to first pitch, chasing down a potential extra-base hit from Paul Goldschmidt at the wall in left-center for the second out of the game.

Video: Statcast™: Hamilton covers 123-ft. before leaping grab

HE SAID IT
"I'm sure the numbers indicated it was the right thing to do. I know I've done similar things. That's a first-place club out there." -- Riggleman, on the D-backs intentionally walking Jose Peraza to face Votto in the eighth inning

Video: ARI@CIN: Votto plates insurance run with RBI single

UP NEXT
Reds right-hander Luis Castillo has been excellent of late, allowing two runs or fewer in each of his last four starts (22 2/3 innings) while striking out 19 and walking just four batters. Castillo makes his 24th start of the season in the Reds' series finale against the D-backs on Sunday (1:10 p.m. ET first pitch). Arizona counters with righty Zack Godley.

Grant Freking is a contributor to MLB.com based in Cincinnati.

Cincinnati Reds, Matt Harvey