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Cards fielding '67, '04 clubs in Dream Bracket 2

@anne__rogers
May 20, 2020

ST. LOUIS -- Two of the best single-season teams in Cardinals history, the World Series champion 1967 Cards and the juggernaut 2004 group, will match up against other clubs’ best single-season teams in MLB Dream Bracket 2: Dream Seasons. Using Out of the Park Baseball 21, Dream Bracket 2 is

ST. LOUIS -- Two of the best single-season teams in Cardinals history, the World Series champion 1967 Cards and the juggernaut 2004 group, will match up against other clubs’ best single-season teams in MLB Dream Bracket 2: Dream Seasons.

Using Out of the Park Baseball 21, Dream Bracket 2 is a 64-team, best-of-seven simulation featuring two all-time teams from each of the 30 current Major League franchises (post-World War II), as well as three Negro Leagues teams and the 1994 Montreal Expos. Game simulations will begin Thursday, and the finals will take place on June 8-9.

See the full Bracket, make picks, win prizes

Here’s a rundown of the two Cardinals teams competing in the bracket:

Complete Dream Bracket 2 rosters

1967 Cardinals
Anchored by Bob Gibson on the mound and Lou Brock in left field, the Cardinals won 101 games in 1967, captured the National League by 10 1/2 games and defeated the Red Sox in seven games in the World Series. A lineup of veterans kept the runs coming, led by first baseman and '67 NL MVP Orlando Cepeda, who hit .325 with 25 home runs and 111 RBIs. Cepeda fit snugly among Brock (who hit 21 homers and stole 52 bases), center fielder Curt Flood (who hit .335), catcher Tim McCarver (who hit .295) and Roger Maris, who finished his career with the Cardinals, driving in 55 RBIs in 125 games.

A young pitching staff complemented Gibson, who missed eight weeks of the second half after Roberto Clemente hit a line drive off Gibson’s right leg in July and fractured his fibula (Gibson still pitched to three more batters). Nelson Briles took over for Gibson and won his last nine decisions of the season. Dick Hughes won 16 games with a 2.67 ERA and finished second in NL Rookie of the Year voting. Lefty Steve Carlton, then 22 years old, went 14-9 with a 2.98 ERA.

The 1967 Cardinals will face the '82 Brewers in the first round on Thursday.

2004 Cardinals
Built upon the backs of Jim Edmonds, Albert Pujols and Scott Rolen, the 2004 Cardinals never played a series in which they weren’t the favorite. They won 105 games, captured the National League pennant for the first time in 17 years and even though they lost to the Red Sox in the World Series, the juggernaut offense made this team one of the best in club history. Pujols, Rolen and Edmonds each contributed more than 100 RBIs and finished third, fourth and fifth, respectively, in NL MVP voting. The pitching staff led the Majors in fewest runs allowed and featured three 15-game winners: Chris Carpenter, Matt Morris and Jason Marquis. The bullpen had a Major League-best 3.01 ERA; Jason Isringhausen notched an NL-leading 47 saves that year, and Ray King and Steve Kline were an effective left-handed tag team.

In August, the Cardinals added former MVP and NL batting champion Larry Walker, who hit .280 in 44 games down the stretch. St. Louis fielded one of the best defensive teams in the Majors, with Edmonds, Rolen and catcher Mike Matheny winning Gold Gloves that year, and shortstop Edgar Renteria in the running for one.

The 2004 Cardinals will face the '08 Phillies in the first round on Friday.

Anne Rogers covers the Cardinals for MLB.com. Follow her on Twitter @anne__rogers and on Facebook.