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Elder Boone confident in son's managerial skills

MLB.com @WashingNats

NEW YORK -- Nationals vice president of player development Bob Boone, a former Major League player and manager, said his son, Aaron, has the knowledge and preparation to succeed in his new role as manager of the Yankees, despite no previous experience as a skipper or coach.

Bob said Aaron was "an excellent choice" and pointed to his son's eight years as an analyst on ESPN as a reference point for his strengths and readiness.

NEW YORK -- Nationals vice president of player development Bob Boone, a former Major League player and manager, said his son, Aaron, has the knowledge and preparation to succeed in his new role as manager of the Yankees, despite no previous experience as a skipper or coach.

Bob said Aaron was "an excellent choice" and pointed to his son's eight years as an analyst on ESPN as a reference point for his strengths and readiness.

"[Aaron's broadcasting] preparation [was] very thorough on every player," said Bob Boone. "He certainly knows the Yankees. [ESPN] did a lot of Yankees and Red Sox games. The only thing he is going to be short on is having to learn some in-game action.

"His personality, his knowledge of the game will be spectacular. The way he deals with people is very special. He has been doing that for a long time. Aaron has the ability to do anything he wants. He is a very unique kid. I think he will handle [the Yankees job] as well as he handled the booth."

Bob believes it's important for the coaching staff to be on the same page with Aaron. Would the elder Boone like to be part of his son's coaching staff?

"My comment is, 'I don't coach,'" Bob said, jokingly. "They took the managerial uniform away from me. So I'm not going back [to coaching] unless there is some real need. Somebody has to ask me. I'm surely not thinking about it."

Before becoming a broadcaster, Aaron played third base for 12 years in the big leagues from 1997 to 2009, hitting .263 and making one All-Star appearance. Aaron played two-plus years for his father in Cincinnati, who was the manager of the Reds from 2001 to 2003. However, Aaron is best known for hitting the pennant-winning home run off Red Sox pitcher Tim Wakefield that helped the Yankees advance to the 2003 World Series.

Video: Must C Classic: Boone send Yankees to World Series

"There is a natural respect for what he has done already in his life," Bob said. "[The Yankees] could care less if he managed three years in Double-A. It's kind of a movement thing. We have seen younger players with very little experience go on to the managerial ranks. I think it would be natural for him."

Bill Ladson has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2002 and does a podcast, Newsmakers. He also could be found on Twitter @WashingNats.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

Washington Nationals, New York Yankees