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A's tender contracts to arb-eligible players

MLB.com @JaneMLB

OAKLAND -- Of the many deadlines clubs deal with in the offseason, Friday's was a cinch for the A's.

Clubs were required to alert each of their arbitration-eligible players whether they will be tendered a contract for the 2018 season by 5 p.m. PT on Friday. The A's had seven of them, and club announced that all of them were tendered deals.

OAKLAND -- Of the many deadlines clubs deal with in the offseason, Friday's was a cinch for the A's.

Clubs were required to alert each of their arbitration-eligible players whether they will be tendered a contract for the 2018 season by 5 p.m. PT on Friday. The A's had seven of them, and club announced that all of them were tendered deals.

Already this week, the A's came to terms on a one-year, $775,000 contract with outfielder Jake Smolinski, who was seemingly the lone arbitration-eligible player at risk of being non-tendered. The remaining seven are now also safe: outfielder Khris Davis, right-handers Kendall Graveman, Blake Treinen, Chris Hatcher and Liam Hendriks, shortstop Marcus Semien and catcher Josh Phegley.

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The two sides now have a couple of months to sign off on salary figures. If an agreement is not met before arbitration hearings begin in February, an arbitration panel will be asked to rule in favor of one side.

Rare has it been for Billy Beane's A's to go to a hearing with a player. Only four times has it happened since Beane took over baseball operations in 1997, and not until last year was he defeated. Following a career-high 42-homer season, Davis was the first to beat the A's in a hearing during Beane's tour, getting $5 million for 2017 rather than the $4.65 million Oakland proposed.

Again Davis is in line for a big raise, with MLB Trade Rumors projecting a 2018 salary of $11.1 million for the slugger, who banged out 43 homers and 110 RBIs -- both career highs -- in his second season with Oakland.

Video: Khris Davis connects for 43 home runs in 2017

The A's, however, don't appear intimidated by this figure. There has even been speculation that they could entertain an extension with Davis, who is expected to see more time at DH than in left field in 2018.

When asked about the challenges of going through a second arbitration process with Davis' camp at the end of the season, A's general manager David Forst said, "It is, but I don't think you could overstate the impact he has on the rest of the lineup."

The willingness to take on Davis' dollars, rather than attempt to trade him, partly stems from the A's financial flexibility. They have less than $18 million guaranteed to players next year -- notably $6 million each for Jed Lowrie, Matt Joyce and Santiago Casilla. Based on projections made by MLBTR, the A's will spend roughly $25 million on their seven arbitration-eligible players, bringing the total to $43 million before factoring in money allotted to pre-arb renewals.

Semien is projected to make $3.2 million in his first year of arbitration eligibility, while Graveman is predicted to earn $2.6 million. Next in line is Treinen, at $2.3 million, and Hatcher, at $2.2 million. Hendriks is expected to come in at $1.9 million, and Phegley at $1.1 million.

Jane Lee has covered the A's for MLB.com since 2010. Follow her on Twitter @JaneMLB and listen to her podcast.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.