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Notes: Sandoval's swing; Davis, Anderson

@mi_guardado
February 18, 2020

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Most Giants players were in uniform early Tuesday morning to partake in Photo Day at Scottsdale Stadium. Pablo Sandoval was, too, but not the baseball kind. Sandoval drew laughs from teammates when he walked into the clubhouse dressed as a construction worker, donning a bright yellow vest

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. -- Most Giants players were in uniform early Tuesday morning to partake in Photo Day at Scottsdale Stadium. Pablo Sandoval was, too, but not the baseball kind.

Sandoval drew laughs from teammates when he walked into the clubhouse dressed as a construction worker, donning a bright yellow vest and a hard hat with a Giants logo.

“My swing is under construction,” Sandoval announced, pantomiming drilling into his bat with his index finger.

Hours later, Sandoval took the field for the first round of live batting practice and impressed manager Gabe Kapler with the aggressiveness of his swings. The 33-year-old switch-hitter faced right-handers Luis Madero and Tyler Cyr and made some solid contact while batting from the left side.

“I've never seen an approach to a live batting practice like Pablo just took,” Kapler said. “It kind of demonstrates why he's so dangerous at the plate because he’s just prepared to drive every pitch. Generally, you calibrate one of two ways, by taking and seeing pitches. The second way is by swinging at pitches. He just took aggressive hacks on everything that Madero was throwing up there.”

Sandoval is rehabbing from Tommy John surgery, but he is ahead of schedule and has been participating in batting practice along with the other position players this week. He could end up taking some at-bats during Cactus League games this spring, but he will need more time to ramp up defensively and is expected to open the season on the injured list.

Davis embracing technology
Outfielder Jaylin Davis is among the Giants' hitters using Blast Motion sensors this spring and said he hopes to use the data from the wearable technology to help establish a baseline for his swing that he can reference in the future. The sensor is attached to the end of the bat and provides hitters with metrics such as exit velocity and bat speed.

“It kind of just sees when I’m going good, what am I doing,” Davis said. “If I’m going bad, it kind of gives me a baseline of what to go back to.”

Davis, one of three prospects acquired from the Twins in exchange for Sam Dyson last year, spent the offseason working with the club’s new hitting coaches to make some adjustments to his swing that he hopes will allow him to get the ball in the air more and better leverage his impressive raw power. Davis crushed 35 home runs in the Minors last season, but he struggled to carry that success over to the Majors, going only 7-for-42 (.167) with one homer over his 17 games with the Giants in September.

Still, the 25-year-old has already emerged as a standout during batting practice and is looking forward to testing out his swing changes in Cactus Leagues games, which begin Saturday.

“You can definitely tell by my BP,” Davis said. “A lot more balls in the air, for sure.”

Anderson progressing
Monday marked a major milestone for left-hander Tyler Anderson, who threw his first bullpen session since undergoing left knee surgery last June. Anderson said he threw 25 fastballs and was pleased with the way his body bounced back on Tuesday. The 30-year-old said he doesn’t have a timetable for his recovery, but he praised the Giants’ medical staff for their “top notch” efforts to get him healthy.

“We haven’t really set any dates,” Anderson said. “You have to kind of take your time and do your due diligence and make sure that nothing pops up. Obviously setbacks happen, so it’s just hard to plan for anything. We’re just going to take it day by day. Whenever I’m ready, I’ll be ready.”

Maria Guardado covers the Giants for MLB.com. She previously covered the Angels from 2017-18. Follow her on Twitter.