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Giants' rotation losing Rodriguez to DL

Righty reportedly injured hamstring when benches cleared during Puig-Hundley altercation
MLB.com @dohyoungpark

Though the Giants have dealt with injuries and turbulence in their starting rotation throughout the season, Dereck Rodriguez has given San Francisco stability and excellence since his May callup. But he, too, succumbed to the injury bug, as the Giants announced Thursday that the rookie starter will be placed on the 10-day disabled list with a Grade 1 hamstring strain.

The injury was reportedly sustained during Tuesday's altercation between the Giants and rival Dodgers in Los Angeles, during which catcher Nick Hundley and Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig exchanged shoves after Puig's strong reaction following a foul ball. Though Hundley was fined an undisclosed amount, Rodriguez's injury represents a steep price for the Giants to pay for the fracas. Puig was suspended two games.

Though the Giants have dealt with injuries and turbulence in their starting rotation throughout the season, Dereck Rodriguez has given San Francisco stability and excellence since his May callup. But he, too, succumbed to the injury bug, as the Giants announced Thursday that the rookie starter will be placed on the 10-day disabled list with a Grade 1 hamstring strain.

The injury was reportedly sustained during Tuesday's altercation between the Giants and rival Dodgers in Los Angeles, during which catcher Nick Hundley and Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig exchanged shoves after Puig's strong reaction following a foul ball. Though Hundley was fined an undisclosed amount, Rodriguez's injury represents a steep price for the Giants to pay for the fracas. Puig was suspended two games.

Video: SF@LAD: Benches clear after Puig, Hundley argue

Rodriguez has arguably been the Giants' most effective starter since his Major League debut on May 29, with a 6-1 record, 2.25 ERA, 65 strikeouts and 10 quality starts in his 12 starts. He has pitched at least six innings in each of his last eight starts and didn't yield more than two earned runs in any of them.

The 26-year-old right-hander, who is the son of Hall of Fame catcher Ivan Rodriguez, is looking to figure prominently into the National League Rookie of the Year conversation at the end of the season, though stellar rookie campaigns from the Braves' Ronald Acuna Jr. and the Nationals' Juan Soto will present a challenge for Rodriguez.

Right-hander Casey Kelly, whose contract was selected from Triple-A Sacramento last Friday, will start in Rodriguez's place on Friday against the Reds. A corresponding roster move will be announced on Friday.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.

San Francisco Giants, Dereck Rodriguez

This Giant is an NL West game-changer

MLB.com @AJCassavell

The National League West is home to a handful of baseball's best all-around players. Unsurprisingly, those players boast some of baseball's most impressive game-changing tools.

There aren't many big leaguers who change the way their opponents prepare because of a singular skill -- whether it's light-tower power, lights-out defense or a rocket arm. But every NL West club has a few.

The National League West is home to a handful of baseball's best all-around players. Unsurprisingly, those players boast some of baseball's most impressive game-changing tools.

There aren't many big leaguers who change the way their opponents prepare because of a singular skill -- whether it's light-tower power, lights-out defense or a rocket arm. But every NL West club has a few.

This week, MLB.com broke down the singular most elite tool on every team in the division. The list is littered with some of the game's most exciting ballplayers, and it's easy to see why.

Video: COL@ARI: Greinke dazzles with 13 K's over 8 innings

D-BACKS
The player and his tool: Zack Greinke's command

Why it matters: There was once a time when Greinke regularly pumped fastballs in the mid-90s, using the pitch as a weapon to get hitters out, even when he missed his location. That time has passed by about half a decade. And yet Greinke remains one of the top pitchers in the NL.

That's almost exclusively because of Greinke's pinpoint command and craftiness. His fastball sits around 90 mph this season, and yet he owns a 3.00 ERA and is striking out more than a hitter per inning.

Greinke consistently mixes about half a dozen pitches into his starts. He locates each with precision and offers little in the way of predictability.

Signature moment this season: Greinke pitched eight innings of two-hit ball against the Rockies on July 22. He struck out 13 and recorded 17 swinging strikes -- two with his fastball, four with his changeup, one with his curveball, seven with his slider, one with his sinker and two with his eephus.

Video: LAD@ARI: Puig catches fly, throws out Marte for DP

DODGERS
The player and his tool: Yasiel Puig's arm

Why it matters: There aren't many tools in baseball that have drawn as much fanfare as Puig's arm. From the moment he arrived in 2012, he put it on full display, turning a game-ending double play in his debut against the Padres from the right-field warning track.

Sure, Puig has drawn some criticism for being careless with his throws, but there's no question he can change a game from out of nowhere with his other-worldly arm strength.

Puig's lasers land on all sorts of highlight reels. But his impact stretches beyond that. Puig has kept countless baserunners in check with the mere threat of his arm. There aren't many outfielders who inspire legitimate fear on the basepaths, but he is one.

Signature moment this season: With the Dodgers and D-backs tied in the 14th inning on April 2, A.J. Pollock lifted a deep drive to the right-field warning track. Against most outfielders, Ketel Marte would've reached second base standing up. But Puig made the catch, spun, and threw a strike to second base on the fly. Marte was toast.

Video: CHC@SF: Posey belts a walk-off RBI single in the 13th

GIANTS
The player and his tool: Buster Posey's hitting

Why it matters: Throughout his career, Posey has always been an outstanding defensive catcher. But there are plenty of outstanding defensive catchers. None can hit like Posey.

Since his rookie campaign in 2010, Posey has never batted below .284. He's flirting with .300 once again this year. Posey has posted an OPS+ of at least 110 in nine straight seasons since '10. Only Joey Votto, Giancarlo Stanton and Robinson Cano have done the same (with a minimum of 100 at-bats). No other catcher is even close. Yasmani Grandal and Yadier Molina have had five such seasons.

Sure, defense is generally regarded as a catcher's most important attribute, and Posey brings plenty of that. But he can win games with his bat just as easily.

Signature moment this season: In a tie game in the 13th inning, Posey delivered a walk-off single against the Cubs on July 11. He went the other way with a 97-mph fastball and served it off the right-field wall for the game-winner.

Video: Must C Crafty: Hedges dives, catches popup, turns two

PADRES
The player and his tool: Austin Hedges' defense

Why it matters: The Padres have fully committed to their youth movement. Nowhere is that more evident than in their starting rotation. Already this season, Joey Lucchesi, Eric Lauer, Brett Kennedy, Jacob Nix and Walker Lockett have debuted as starters.

In the Padres' eyes, it's essential that their young arms have a reliable presence behind the plate. Hedges is as steady as they come. Over the past few weeks, he has begun to turn a corner with his bat. But Hedges' defense remains his calling card.

Hedges' best attribute is his pitch-framing ability, and for the second straight season, he ranks near the top in most framing metrics (though not quite so high, because he missed a month and a half with elbow tendinitis). He can also impact play with his blocking ability, his arm, his game-calling and his overall athleticism.

Signature moment this season: In an April game against the Giants, Gregor Blanco attempted to lay down a bunt and popped it up behind the plate. Hedges made an all-out diving grab, then threw to first base from his backside to double up Brandon Crawford. Good luck finding a better play from a catcher this season.

Video: COL@ARI: Arenado belts 2 home runs vs. the D-backs

ROCKIES
The player and his tool: Nolan Arenado's power

Why it matters: There might not be a toolsier player in the NL West than Arenado. He's got a cannon. He routinely hits above .300. Arenado is one of the best defenders in the world.

But this season, Arenado's most impactful attribute has been his power. It is, quite literally, a game-changer. He's given the Rockies a lead 11 times this season with a home run.

No one pulls the ball with authority quite like Arenado. His pull-side slugging percentage has hovered around 1.000 this year, and it's a big reason why he's challenging for the league lead in homers and RBIs.

Signature moment this season: Locked in a tight NL West race, Arenado made his presence felt against Arizona on July 20. He took Robbie Ray deep in the top of the first inning. Arenado went deep again in the fifth, clubbing a game-tying two-run shot. Colorado won the game, an 11-10 slugfest.

AJ Cassavell covers the Padres for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell.

Nolan Arenado, Zack Greinke, Austin Hedges, Buster Posey, Yasiel Puig

Hundley fined for role in fracas with Dodgers

MLB.com

Yasiel Puig received a two-game suspension and an undisclosed fine for fighting and inciting a benches-clearing incident Tuesday at Dodger Stadium, Major League Baseball announced Thursday. Giants catcher Nick Hundley received an undisclosed fine for his role in the incident.

In the seventh inning of the Dodgers' 2-1 loss to San Francisco, Puig expressed frustration after fouling off a Tony Watson pitch, and he and Hundley proceeded to exchange heated words. The situation escalated quickly as Puig pushed Hundley, who shoved him back, prompting members of both teams to spill out of the dugouts and sprint toward home plate.

Yasiel Puig received a two-game suspension and an undisclosed fine for fighting and inciting a benches-clearing incident Tuesday at Dodger Stadium, Major League Baseball announced Thursday. Giants catcher Nick Hundley received an undisclosed fine for his role in the incident.

In the seventh inning of the Dodgers' 2-1 loss to San Francisco, Puig expressed frustration after fouling off a Tony Watson pitch, and he and Hundley proceeded to exchange heated words. The situation escalated quickly as Puig pushed Hundley, who shoved him back, prompting members of both teams to spill out of the dugouts and sprint toward home plate.

Both players were ejected from the game.

Video: SF@LAD: Puig, Roberts, Hundley on fierce exchange

"When I missed the pitch, I knew that was the best pitch Watson was going to throw me, so I was a little upset," Puig said after the game through a Dodgers interpreter. "[Hundley] told me to stop complaining and get back into the box, and when I got into his face, he told me to also get out of his face, so that's when I got upset.

"I didn't like that he was telling me what to do, and then he said some words to me in English that I really can't repeat. That's why I was upset."

Hundley downplayed the incident, chalking it up to the emotions of a tense division rivalry.

"We're competing on the field against a team we're chasing," he said. "They've been scuffling a little bit, and we're trying to catch them. It's obviously a nice rivalry. We had some words, pushed a couple of times and you saw what happened. There's really nothing more to it than that."

Barring appeal, Puig's suspension begins Friday in Seattle. Tuesday's incident marked the fourth career ejection for both players, and neither had been tossed since 2015.

Chad Thornburg is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles.

San Francisco Giants, Nick Hundley

Inbox: Where's the recognition for Moronta?

Beat reporter Chris Haft answers questions from fans
MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

I am so pleased with the results of Dereck Rodriguez, but why hasn't Reyes Moronta been given more recognition? He's a beast!
-- John S., Crystal Lake, Ill.

I'll readily acknowledge that I should have seized an opportunity to write something more extensive about Moronta. I'll try my best to do so before the season ends. He seems to have an absolutely fearless attitude. You could even make a case for Moronta to be the team's most valuable player. Sure, guys like Buster Posey and Brandon Crawford are probably more talented. But with the possible exception of Rodriguez, who is performing his respective role this season better than Moronta has?

I am so pleased with the results of Dereck Rodriguez, but why hasn't Reyes Moronta been given more recognition? He's a beast!
-- John S., Crystal Lake, Ill.

I'll readily acknowledge that I should have seized an opportunity to write something more extensive about Moronta. I'll try my best to do so before the season ends. He seems to have an absolutely fearless attitude. You could even make a case for Moronta to be the team's most valuable player. Sure, guys like Buster Posey and Brandon Crawford are probably more talented. But with the possible exception of Rodriguez, who is performing his respective role this season better than Moronta has?

Submit your question to the Giants Inbox

When are we going to see Chris Shaw? Do you think he will be much of a contributor for the Giants in the coming years? I get the impression that he is an Adam Duvall type of player, in that he won't do much at AT&T Park, but perhaps would thrive in a place like Cincinnati. Does this mean that Shaw might be worth more to trade now than to lose value as his power disappears in San Francisco, like it does for so many players -- such as Jarrett Parker or Mac Williamson?
-- Will P., Idaho Falls, Idaho

With 132 strikeouts in 361 at-bats with Triple-A Sacramento entering Thursday, it's fair to say that Shaw is undergoing some adjustments with his hitting. If he's struggling to hit, including him among the September callups could do him more harm than good, though his total of 22 home runs reflects his considerable potential.

I think it's wrong to speculate about Shaw's future. Give him a chance to show what he can become. Don't automatically assume that Shaw is destined to develop into yet another hitter whose skills, psyche or both are broken by AT&T Park's challenging dimensions. Right now, he apparently needs to gain consistency at the plate. I've had relatively few encounters with Shaw, but I believe that he possesses enough mental toughness to handle whatever's thrown at him. We'll find out soon enough whether the skeptics or believers are correct.

Where do you see Joey Bart playing next season? Do you think he could be playing in Sacramento next year?
-- Al N., Rancho Cordova

Bart very well could finish the season in Triple-A. But rare is the Giants prospect who doesn't spend at least a few months with Class A Advanced San Jose. The California League has long been a superb training ground for players. Look for Bart to begin the season with San Jose. But if he continues to be as good as he apparently is, he won't stay there for long.

I fear that the Giants will wait too long to move Posey to a less demanding position to prolong his career. Trading Brandon Belt and installing Posey at first base could be a solution. If that is not feasible, could Posey make the transition to third base?
-- Gerald L., Columbus, Ind.

Finding a taker for Belt is crucial to your scenario. And despite Belt's .800-plus career OPS, other teams probably would avoid dealing for him due to his injury history and $16 million annual salary through 2021. So unless a club that wants to acquire Belt is willing to assume a significant portion of his salary, I don't envision the Giants trading him to clear first base for Posey.

As for Posey moving to third, precedents exist for this sort of thing. Suffice it to say that this kind of switch doesn't always work. In 1982, the Reds thought that moving future Hall of Fame catcher Johnny Bench to third base would be a great idea. That season, he accumulated 19 errors in 107 games and finished with a minus-15 rating in total fielding runs. Bench's '83 numbers improved to six errors and a minus-3 rating. That's because he appeared in only 42 games at third.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants, Reyes Moronta

Every 30-30 season, ranked by club

MLB.com

The marvel of the 30-30 club is predicated on the rare combination of speed and power it takes to swipe 30 bases and bash 30 homers in the same season. The feat has been pulled off just 60 times in baseball history, though there are a few players who could join the club in 2018, starting with Cleveland's Jose Ramirez, who has already surpassed 30 homers and has 27 steals through Wednesday's action.

40-40 club: 40 steals, 40 homers in a season

The marvel of the 30-30 club is predicated on the rare combination of speed and power it takes to swipe 30 bases and bash 30 homers in the same season. The feat has been pulled off just 60 times in baseball history, though there are a few players who could join the club in 2018, starting with Cleveland's Jose Ramirez, who has already surpassed 30 homers and has 27 steals through Wednesday's action.

40-40 club: 40 steals, 40 homers in a season

Here is a team-by-team breakdown of the 30-30 club, ranked in order from the team with the most 30-30 seasons to least -- there are actually eight teams that have never had someone pull off the feat. (Note: We list franchises together, even if the club moved.) 

Giants: 7
Barry Bonds, 1997 (40 HR, 37 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1996 (42 HR, 40 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1995 (33 HR, 31 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1973 (39 HR, 43 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1969 (32 HR, 45 SB)
Willie Mays, 1957 (35 HR, 38 SB)
Willie Mays, 1956 (36 HR, 40 SB)
Mays posted the first two 30-30 seasons in National League history, and narrowly missed the mark in 1958 (29 HR, 31 SB) and '59 (34-27). In the twilight of his career, he saw teammate Bobby Bonds accomplish the feat twice with the Giants (en route to finishing his career with five). The younger Bonds later matched his father with his third, fourth and fifth 30-30 seasons in the late '90s -- no other hitter has notched three straight such campaigns. Remarkably, both of the Bonds came within four homers or steals of another 30-30 campaign three times each.

Mets: 5
David Wright, 2007 (30 HR, 34 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1991 (38 HR, 30 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1989 (36 HR, 41 SB)
Howard Johnson, 1987 (36 HR, 32 SB)
Darryl Strawberry, 1987 (39 HR, 36 SB)
It's surprising to see Strawberry's name on this list only once -- though it should come as no surprise that he also came close in 1984 (26 HR, 27 SB), '85 (29-26), '86 (27-28) and '88 (39-29). Johnson, his teammate for nine seasons, wasn't even an All-Star in '87, when the Mets became one of only two teams ever with two 30-30 players in a season. Only Mike Cameron came close until Wright's career-best '07 campaign.

Video: NYM@CHC: Strawberry swipes bag, joins 30/30 club

Braves: 4
Ron Gant, 1991 (32 HR, 34 SB)
Ron Gant, 1990 (32 HR, 33 SB)
Dale Murphy, 1983 (36 HR, 30 SB)
Hank Aaron, 1963 * (44 HR, 31 SB)
* Milwaukee Braves
Aaron's 30-30 season was just the fourth in history, and he came close again in 1968 (29 HR, 28 SB). Gant came close again when he had 36 homers and 26 steals in 1993. In Chipper Jones' NL MVP Award-winning year of 1999, he slugged 45 homers and swiped 25 bags, which is Atlanta's closest call since then.

Rangers: 4
Ian Kinsler, 2011 (32 HR, 30 SB)
Ian Kinsler, 2009 (31 HR, 31 SB)
Alfonso Soriano, 2005 (36 HR, 30 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1978 (31 HR, 43 SB)
Bonds posted the last of his then-unheard-of five 30-30 seasons in 1978, starting the year with the White Sox before posting the majority of his homers (29) and steals (37) in 130 games with the Rangers. His five 30-30 campaigns was matched only by his son, Barry, though Soriano also came close with four. The consistent Kinsler's only 30-30 campaigns came in the only two 30-steal seasons of his career.

Video: TEX@LAA: Kinsler joins 30-30 club with steal of third

Astros: 3
Carlos Beltran, 2004 (38 HR, 42 SB)
Jeff Bagwell, 1999 (42 HR, 30 SB)
Jeff Bagwell, 1997 (43 HR, 31 SB)
Beltran actually split his memorable 2004 season between Kansas City and Houston, coming over via trade just ahead of the non-waiver Trade Deadline. Beltran swiped a career-high 42 bases that year, including 28 in just 90 games with the Astros. Bagwell, who was never overly touted for his speed, quietly swiped 61 of his career 202 over the 1997 and '99 seasons. 

Video: HOU@CIN: Bagwell is first Astro to join 30-30 club

Brewers: 3
Ryan Braun, 2012 (41 HR, 30 SB)
Ryan Braun, 2011 (33 HR, 33 SB)
Tommy Harper, 1970 (31 HR, 38 SB)
Coming off a 73-steal campaign with the expansion Seattle Pilots in 1969, Harper knocked a career-high 31 homers in '70 for the first 30-30 season in the American League since Ken Williams of the St. Louis Browns in '22. Braun's two 30-30 seasons were the only 30-steal campaigns of his career, for which he won the NL MVP Award in 2011.

Video: MIL@CIN: Braun homers twice to join 30-30 club

Dodgers: 3
Matt Kemp, 2011 (39 HR, 40 SB)
Raul Mondesi, 1999 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Raul Mondesi, 1997 (30 HR, 32 SB)
Davey Lopes, Pedro Guerrero and Kirk Gibson all came close, but Mondesi finally became the first Dodger in the 30-30 club with the only 30-steal campaigns of his 13-year career in 1997 and '99. Kemp flirted with the feat in 2009 (26 HR, 34 SB) before achieving it in '11 with a league-leading 39 homers and 126 RBIs to go with a career-best 40 steals. He lost the NL MVP Award to Braun, a fellow 30-30 club member in '11.

Video: COL@LAD: Kemp joins 30-30 club with homer in seventh

Nationals: 3
Alfonso Soriano, 2006 (46 HR, 41 SB)
Vladimir Guerrero, 2002 * (39 HR, 40 SB)
Vladimir Guerrero, 2001 * (34 HR, 37 SB)
* Montreal Expos
Guerrero had two 30-steal seasons in his 16-year career, and he made the most of both with a pair of 30-30 campaigns, narrowly missing the fourth 40-40 season in history in 2002. Four years later, following the franchise's move to the nation's capital, Soriano recorded the most homers ever in a 30-30 campaign (his fourth) and registered the fourth and final 40-40 season to date.

Phillies: 3
Jimmy Rollins, 2007 (30 HR, 41 SB)
Bobby Abreu, 2004 (30 HR, 40 SB)
Bobby Abreu, 2001 (31 HR, 36 SB)
Abreu's 2001 and '04 campaigns were the finest of his career, representing the two highest homer and steal totals of his 18 seasons in the Major Leagues. Rollins was always a threat on the basepaths, but his power only began to emerge later in his career, culminating in a career-high 30 homers, 41 steals and league-leading triple (20) and run (139) totals in his 2007 NL MVP Award-winning campaign.

Reds: 3
Brandon Phillips, 2007 (30 HR, 32 SB)
Barry Larkin, 1996 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Eric Davis, 1987 (37 HR, 50 SB)
In 1987, Davis joined the 30-30 club in style, becoming the first player to do so with 50 steals (only Barry Bonds has joined him since) -- and he only played in 129 games. A season earlier, he was only three homers shy of an astonishing 30-80 season. Davis and Rickey Henderson remain the only members of the 20-80 club. Larkin's 33 homers in '96 were by far a career high, as were Phillips' 30 long balls in 2007.

Video: HOU@CIN: Phillips joins 30-30 club with 30th homer

Rockies: 3
Larry Walker, 1997 (49 HR, 33 SB)
Dante Bichette, 1996 (31 HR, 31 SB)
Ellis Burks, 1996 (40 HR, 32 SB)
The 1996 Blake Street Bombers were the second team in history ('87 Mets) with two 30-30 hitters in the same season. Bichette wasn't so much of a surprise -- he'd posted double-digit homers and steals in the three previous years. But Burks raised some eyebrows with his 30-30 campaign, as he'd stolen a combined 36 bases in the previous six seasons. Walker's 49 homers and 33 steals were both career highs as he won the NL MVP Award in '97.

Yankees: 3
Alfonso Soriano, 2003 (38 HR, 35 SB)
Alfonso Soriano, 2002 (39 HR, 41 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1975 (32 HR, 30 SB)
Though Mickey Mantle (31 HR, 21 SB) came reasonably close in 1959, Bonds became the first Yankee in the 30-30 club in '75. Rickey Henderson had a pair of 20-80 campaigns, including a 28-homer, 87-steal season in '86, but it was Soriano that ultimately joined Bonds with the first two of his four 30-30 seasons. Since then, Curtis Granderson came closest, with 41 homers and 25 steals in 2011.

Video: NYY@BAL: Soriano clubs 30th homer to join 30-30 club

Angels: 2
Mike Trout, 2012 (30 HR, 48 SB)
Bobby Bonds, 1977 (37 HR, 41 SB)
Trout took the Majors by storm during his rookie season in 2012, compiling a 30-30 year that hasn't been matched since. Some argue that had it not been for Miguel Cabrera winning the first Triple Crown in 45 years that Trout would've won the AL MVP Award that season. Bonds spent parts of just two seasons in Anaheim, and he made his second count. 

Video: LAA@TEX: Trout becomes youngest member of 30/30 club

Blue Jays: 2
Jose Cruz, 2001 (34 HR, 32 SB)
Shawn Green, 1998 (35 HR, 35 SB)
The 1998 Jays missed the playoffs despite Green posting the first 30-30 season in team history and Jose Canseco coming a steal shy (46 HR, 29 SB) of joining him. The 35 steals were a career high for Green, who hadn't posted more than 16 homers or steals in a season to that point. Cruz more than doubled his previous career high in steals for his 30-30 campaign.

Cubs: 2
Sammy Sosa, 1995 (36 HR, 34 SB)
Sammy Sosa, 1993 (33 HR, 36 SB)
Sosa began his career with decent power and great speed before morphing into the feared slugger that he became in his prime. During his transition, his power and speed came together for a pair of 30-30 campaigns, including his first All-Star season in 1995. Ryne Sandberg had come close in '90 (40 HR, 25 SB), and Corey Patterson came close most recently (24-32) in 2004.

Video: PIT@CHC: Sosa joins 30/30 club for second time

Indians: 2
Grady Sizemore, 2008 (33 HR, 38 SB)
Joe Carter, 1987 (32 HR, 31 SB)
Carter's only 30-steal season of his 16-year career gained him entry to the 30-30 club in 1987 after he came a homer and a steal shy a year earlier. He threatened again a season later (27 HR, 27 SB). Before injuries derailed a promising career, Sizemore was a perennial 30-30 threat, finally achieving the feat in 2008 with career bests in both homers and steals.

Video: Sizemore's leadoff homer gets him into the 30-30 club

Marlins: 2
Hanley Ramirez, 2008 (33 HR, 35 SB)
Preston Wilson, 2000 (31 HR, 36 SB)
Ramirez burst onto the scene with a pair of 50-steal seasons to start his career, but as his power numbers increased, his stolen-base numbers dwindled, and though he came close in 2007 (29 HR, 51 SB), his only 30-30 season came a year later. Wilson swiped 87 bags in four full seasons with the Marlins, and a career-high total of 36 came in '00.

Video: Hanley Ramirez joins the 30-30 club

Pirates: 2
Barry Bonds, 1992 (34 HR, 39 SB)
Barry Bonds, 1990 (33 HR, 52 SB)
Bonds' 52 steals in 1990 were the most in a 30-30 campaign, putting him in an elite group -- he and the Reds' Eric Davis (in '87) are the only members of the 30-50 club. Needless to say, he won the first of his seven NL MVP Awards that year, and he repeated the feat two years later, winning another MVP Award in his walk year before joining the Giants in free agency. More recently, Jason Bay, Nate McLouth and Andrew McCutchen have come close.

Video: PHI@PIT: Bonds hits 30th homer to join 30-30 club

Athletics: 1
Jose Canseco, 1988 (42 HR, 40 SB)
Forget 30-30 -- how about 40-40? Canseco's memorable 1988 campaign saw him lead the Majors with 42 homers and 124 RBIs en route to the AL MVP Award, and he became not only the first in franchise history to 30-30, but he also became the first in baseball history to 40-40. Only three others have matched the feat since.

Video: OAK@MIL: Canseco becomes first player to go 40/40

Mariners: 1
Alex Rodriguez, 1998 (42 HR, 46 SB)
Many don't associate Rodriguez with speed anymore, but he stole double-digit bases in 13 of his first 14 full seasons in the Major Leagues. A-Rod posted lofty homer and RBI totals as a 22-year-old shortstop in 1998, and he also ran wild that season, swiping a career-high 46 bags (but also being caught 13 times), posting one of only four 40-40 seasons in history.

Orioles: 1
Ken Williams, 1922 * (39 HR, 37 SB)
* St. Louis Browns
The idea of a 30-30 season before the end of the dead ball era in 1920 was far-fetched, but with the emergence of sluggers like Babe Ruth and Rogers Hornsby, it became at least a possibility -- though Ruth wasn't exactly known for his speed. Williams had both the power and speed tools, though, and in '22, with Ruth suspended for 60 games to open the season, Williams led the league in homers and swiped 37 bags for the first 30-30 campaign in baseball history.

Red Sox: 1
Jacoby Ellsbury, 2011 (32 HR, 39 SB)
For as long as the storied Red Sox franchise has been around, it took until Ellsbury's tremendous 2011 campaign, the only season of his career with more than 16 homers, for Boston to finally have a hitter join the 30-30 club. Carl Yastrzemski (40 HR, 23 SB) came close in 1970, as did Nomar Garciaparra (30 HR, 22 SB) in '97, and Mookie Betts is on pace to join Ellsbury in 2018, boasting 27 homers and 24 steals with over a month remaining in the season.

Video: BOS@NYY: Ellsbury homers to become part of 30-30 club

Cardinals: 0
Closest call: Ray Lankford, 1998 (31 HR, 26 SB)
For all of their rich history, the Cardinals perhaps suprisingly haven't had a player compile a 30-30 season. Lankford was perhaps the closest to accomplish the feat, coming just four stolen bases shy in 1998. 

D-backs: 0
Closest call: Paul Goldschmidt, 2016 (24 HR, 32 SB)
A perennial threat on the bases -- in spite of his size, stature and position -- Goldschmidt stole a career-high 32 bases in 2016, but he did so in a year where he had a power drought, at least by his standards, which is why he's included here. Goldschmidt had clubbed 30 homers in three of his six full seasons entering '18. In an era where clubs are becoming more apprehensive on the basepaths, the D-backs remain one of the most aggressive. Perhaps they won't be without a member for long. 

Padres: 0
Closest call: Wil Myers, 2016 (28 HR, 28 SB)
Myers came just two homers and two stolen bases shy of becoming the first player in Friars history to join the coveted club during his All-Star season in 2016. 

Rays: 0
Closest call: Melvin Upton Jr., 2012 (28 HR, 31 SB)
Upton put together one of his best seasons in 2012, coming just two homers shy of becoming the first Rays player to join the 30-30 club. Upton's 31 stolen bases that year were impressive, but three times in his career he exceeded 40. His 28 homers in '12 were a personal high, and he clubbed them in the final year before he hit free agency. That offseason, Upton signed a massive multiyear contract with the Braves. 

Royals: 0
Closest call: Carlos Beltran, 2002 (29 HR, 35 SB)
There can't be a more credible close call here than an actual member of the 30-30 club, and despite coming just one homer shy in 2002, he went on to join the club two seasons later, in a year he was traded from the Royals to the Astros. 

Tigers: 0
Closest call: Kirk Gibson, 1985 (29 HR, 30 SB)
Gibson clubbed a career-high 29 in 1985, coming just one deep fly shy of being the lone Tiger in the franchise's rich history in the 30-30 club. 

Twins: 0
Closest call: Corey Koskie, 2001 (26 HR, 27 SB)
No Twins player has come all that close to joining the 30-30 club other than Koskie, who put together his best offensive year in 2001 but didn't reach either of the baselines.

White Sox: 0
Closest call: Magglio Ordonez, 2001 (31 HR, 25 SB)
The six-time All-Star had one of his best seasons in 2001, leading the team with 25 steals. No White Sox player has come all that more close to joining the club, though, before or since. 

Daniel Kramer is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. Follow him on Twitter at @DKramer_.

Do-Hyoung Park is a reporter for MLB.com based in the Bay Area. Follow him on Twitter at @dohyoungpark.

Giants' nicknames for Players' Weekend

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Here are the nicknames the Giants will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

For the second consecutive year, Major Leaguers will put their personalities and passions on the field when Players' Weekend takes center stage during all games from Friday, Aug. 24, through Sunday, Aug. 26.

Here are the nicknames the Giants will wear on their backs while sporting colorful, non-traditional uniforms featuring alternate designs inspired by youth-league uniforms:

:: Players' Weekend presented by Valspar Stain ::

Shop for Players' Weekend gear
2018 Players' Weekend nicknames
Best nickname for every team
All you need to know about Players' Weekend

Brandon Belt: "BOB"
Ty Blach: "THE PREACHER"
Ray Black: "BLACKOUT"
Madison Bumgarner: "MAD-BUM"
Brandon Crawford: "DJ BC RAW"
Johnny Cueto: "EL JUCHO"

Video: Get ready, 2018 Players' Weekend is August 24-26 Chase d'Arnaud: "CHEETAH"
Sam Dyson: "PSSST"
Steven Duggar: "DUGG"
Julian Fernandez: "BILLETE"
Alen Hanson: "EL CHAMAQUITO"
Gorkys Hernandez: "CAZADOR"
Derek Holland: "LAST NAME"
Nick Hundley: "HUNDO"
Pierce Johnson: "P.J."
Derek Law: "D-LAW"
Evan Longoria: "LONGO"
Andrew McCutchen: "ZOOM"
Mark Melancon: "MEL"
Reyes Moronta: "EL TIBU"
Joe Panik: "J.P."
Hunter Pence: "UNDERPANTS"
Buster Posey: "BUSTER"
Dereck Rodriguez: "D-ROD"
Jeff Samardzija: "SHARK"
Pablo Sandoval: "PANDA"
Will Smith: "SMITTY"
Austin Slater: "MAYOR"
Hunter Strickland: "STRICK"
Andrew Suarez: "ANDY"
Tony Watson: "TONE RANGER"

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants

After McCutchen's clutch HR, Giants fall in 12

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

LOS ANGELES -- The Giants absorbed a frustrating, but not particularly critical, defeat Wednesday night, as Brian Dozier's 12th-inning sacrifice fly drove in the winning run and gave the Dodgers a 4-3 victory at Dodger Stadium.

Giants right-hander Casey Kelly gave up a double to Yasmani Grandal leading off the bottom of the 12th. Max Muncy singled Grandal to third. Then came Dozier, whose fly ball to left-center field scored Grandal easily.

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LOS ANGELES -- The Giants absorbed a frustrating, but not particularly critical, defeat Wednesday night, as Brian Dozier's 12th-inning sacrifice fly drove in the winning run and gave the Dodgers a 4-3 victory at Dodger Stadium.

Giants right-hander Casey Kelly gave up a double to Yasmani Grandal leading off the bottom of the 12th. Max Muncy singled Grandal to third. Then came Dozier, whose fly ball to left-center field scored Grandal easily.

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All was not lost for the Giants. They captured the first two games of the three-game series, perpetuating their dreams of securing a postseason berth. Capturing a National League Wild Card spot could be difficult for the Giants, given the plethora of contenders. But winning the NL West remains a realistic goal for San Francisco, though many games will become a must-win situation.

The Giants overcame deficits in the eighth inning or later in all three games against the Dodgers.

"It shows that we just don't quit, that we have to finish," said right fielder Andrew McCutchen, whose three-run, eighth-inning homer tied the game and forced extra innings. "Regardless of what the score is, regardless of what inning it is, at any given moment we can come alive and score some runs."

The schedule illustrates why the Giants should maintain hope. Their next three series are against sub-.500 teams: the Reds, Mets and Rangers. Then comes a three-game showdown at home against the D-backs, the NL West leader.

First comes the rest of the Giants' three-city, 10-game road trip, which takes them to Cincinnati and New York.

"This is a big road trip," said Giants starter Derek Holland, who pitched 4 2/3 scoreless innings but exited after throwing 93 pitches. "We have to take advantage of where we are in this situation. We have to try to push and get all the wins we can."

Video: SF@LAD: Holland gets Puig looking for 7th strikeout

The Giants likely need to seize this opportunity, because September looms as a challenging month. Following a Labor Day weekend series at home against the Mets, San Francisco will play 12 consecutive games against teams that currently own winning records: two series against Colorado, which sandwich confrontations against Milwaukee and Atlanta.

The Giants are 27-35 on the road this season. However, they've won six of their last nine road games.

McCutchen gave the Giants exactly what they needed in the eighth. San Francisco trailed, 3-0, when Hunter Pence singled and Chase d'Arnaud walked to open the inning against Caleb Ferguson, the Dodgers' second reliever after starter Hyun-Jin Ryu limited the Giants to three hits in six innings.

Ferguson struck out Nick Hundley before McCutchen belted an 0-1 curveball over the center-field wall for his 14th homer of the season, tying him with Brandon Belt for the team lead.

The Dodgers snapped a scoreless tie in the sixth against Reyes Moronta. Yasiel Puig doubled, advanced on Grandal's long flyout and scored on Joc Pederson's sacrifice fly.

Los Angeles added a pair of runs in the seventh off right-hander Ray Black, who courted trouble by walking Justin Turner. Manny Machado's double scored Turner before Matt Kemp lashed an RBI single

"It was a heck of a series, a hard-fought series," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. "It's good to see the fight in these guys. Every game, they fought and scratched and clawed. We just couldn't figure out a way to get one more run."

YOU GOTTA SEE THIS
Maybe Giants center fielder Gorkys Hernandez should try pitching when he's not busy playing outfield, his primary position. Hernandez scooped up Kemp's fifth-inning single and unleashed a throw that traveled at a velocity of 94.9 mph and carried 233 feet into catcher Buster Posey's glove, according to Statcast™.

Hernandez's throw home retired Dozier, who appeared to have scored with a head-first slide. But the Giants immediately called for a replay review, which overturned the call.

"I know I'm supposed to hit the cutoff man," said Hernandez, who went on to explain that throwing home to Posey was probably the only way to secure the out.

"What a great play Gorkys made," Bochy said. "Great play by Buster, too, to keep it a tight ballgame."

Video: SF@LAD: Gorkys' 94.9-mph throw nabs Dozier at plate

UP NEXT
Following a day off -- which happens to begin a stretch of six of seven Thursdays when the club will be idle -- the Giants open a three-game series at Cincinnati on Friday at 4:10 p.m. PT. San Francisco will start right-hander Dereck Rodriguez (6-1, 2.25 ERA), their strongest NL Rookie of the Year Award candidate since Posey won the award in 2010. Rodriguez has recorded eight consecutive quality starts. He'll be opposed by Reds right-hander Anthony DeSclafani (6-3, 4.46).

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants, Andrew McCutchen

Giants skipping No. 5 starter, shuffling rotation

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

LOS ANGELES -- Striving to enter the thick of the National League West race, the Giants opted to skip using a No. 5 starter and will send their hottest pitchers against the Reds this weekend at Great American Ball Park.

Dereck Rodriguez, Madison Bumgarner and Andrew Suarez will start for the Giants from Friday through Sunday, respectively. Thursday's off-day enabled the Giants to use their top starters without costing them rest. San Francisco entered Wednesday trailing first-place Arizona by five games in the NL West.

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LOS ANGELES -- Striving to enter the thick of the National League West race, the Giants opted to skip using a No. 5 starter and will send their hottest pitchers against the Reds this weekend at Great American Ball Park.

Dereck Rodriguez, Madison Bumgarner and Andrew Suarez will start for the Giants from Friday through Sunday, respectively. Thursday's off-day enabled the Giants to use their top starters without costing them rest. San Francisco entered Wednesday trailing first-place Arizona by five games in the NL West.

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Bochy mentioned "keeping these guys in order" as a reason for skipping the fifth starter, who would have been either Ty Blach or Casey Kelly. Bochy's typical approach is to use the fifth starter as much as possible so that when an off-day materializes on the schedule, every starter can benefit from an additional day of rest. Even when the rotation featured All-Stars such as Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain and Ryan Vogelsong, Bochy kept the front five intact much more often than not.

However, seizing the moment was essential for the Giants as they'll need a fifth starter on Tuesday vs. the Mets.

Rodriguez has recorded eight consecutive quality starts. Bumgarner has compiled a 1.73 ERA over his last four starts. And Suarez pitched six scoreless innings in Tuesday's win over the Dodgers to end a five-game stretch in which he went 1-3 with a 7.43 ERA.

Worth noting
• Shortstop Brandon Crawford rejoined the starting lineup on Wednesday after missing Tuesday's game for precautionary purposes. Crawford endured a rough collision Monday with left fielder Gorkys Hernandez as they pursued Clayton Kershaw's pop fly. Crawford speculated that he could have played Tuesday, but wholeheartedly endorsed the Giants' careful approach.

"Just in case something happened yesterday, getting hit in the head again somehow, or making a diving play and jarring my head again," Crawford said.

• Bochy announced that right-hander Jeff Samardzija will pitch one more simulated game Friday in Cincinnati. He'll progress to a Minor League rehab assignment if that outing goes well.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants

McCutchen's play-by-play of Giants' brawl

There was a bench-clearing kerfuffle that occurred during the Giants' 2-1 win over the Dodgers on Tuesday night. Los Angeles outfielder Yasiel Puig and San Francisco catcher Nick Hundley were ejected following the incident, and Andrew McCutchen was gracious enough to give us the breakdown of it.

Puig, Hundley tangle as benches clear in LA

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

LOS ANGELES -- Those longtime antagonists, the Giants and Dodgers, renewed hostilities on Tuesday night with a benches-and-bullpens-clearing incident in the seventh inning of San Francisco's 2-1 win at Dodger Stadium.

Los Angeles right fielder Yasiel Puig and San Francisco catcher Nick Hundley were ejected from the game for igniting the furor, which seemingly sprang from nowhere during Puig's at-bat.

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LOS ANGELES -- Those longtime antagonists, the Giants and Dodgers, renewed hostilities on Tuesday night with a benches-and-bullpens-clearing incident in the seventh inning of San Francisco's 2-1 win at Dodger Stadium.

Los Angeles right fielder Yasiel Puig and San Francisco catcher Nick Hundley were ejected from the game for igniting the furor, which seemingly sprang from nowhere during Puig's at-bat.

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Puig had a 1-2 count when he appeared to express frustration at fouling off a Tony Watson pitch. Following that, he and Hundley began jawing at each other. Emotions skyrocketed quickly, as Puig pushed Hundley, who quickly responded with a shove. That's all it took for members of both teams to sprint toward home plate and hover threateningly around each other, except for the handful who actively tried to separate Puig and Hundley to prevent matters from escalating.

Speaking through a Dodgers interpreter, Puig claimed that Hundley took issue with his self-disgust.

"When I missed the pitch, I knew that was the best pitch Watson was going to throw me, so I was a little upset," Puig said. "[Hundley] told me to stop complaining and get back into the box, and when I got into his face he told me to also get out of his face, so that's when I got upset."

The disagreement could have stopped there. It didn't.

"I didn't like that he was telling me what to do, and then he said some words to me in English that I really can't repeat," Puig said. "That's why I was upset."

Video: SF@LAD: Puig, Roberts, Hundley on fierce exchange

Hundley offered his explanation for the built-in tension.

"We're competing on the field against a team we're chasing," he said. "They've been scuffling a little bit and we're trying to catch them. It's obviously a nice rivalry. We had some words, pushed a couple of times and you saw what happened. There's really nothing more to it than that."

Hundley refused to divulge anything about his dialogue with Puig.

"All the stuff that's said on the field, that'll be left out there," Hundley said.

If Hundley regretted anything, it was inadvertently placing Dodgers third-base coach George Lombard in harm's way. Lombard entered the fray apparently to serve as a would-be peacemaker. Instead, he got thrown in a small cement mixer of bodies.

"He was in there trying to break it up," Hundley said. "I think he got caught in my chest protector."

This wasn't Puig's first confrontational experience with the Giants. He and San Francisco's ace, Madison Bumgarner, exchanged harsh words and cold stares in previous seasons. And just a night earlier, Bumgarner appeared to have an issue similar to Hundley's, seemingly taking some exception to Puig expressing frustration in the batter's box.

"It doesn't happen with other teams, and it doesn't seem to happen when we're in San Francisco," Puig said. "It usually seems to happen when we're here, and I'm not going to let them act like that in our house."

It was the fourth career ejection for both players. Neither had been tossed since 2015.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

Los Angeles Dodgers, San Francisco Giants, Nick Hundley, Yasiel Puig

Giants stay in hunt with another last-at-bat win

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

LOS ANGELES -- The Giants pulled themselves away from ringside to record their second final-at-bat victory over the Dodgers in two days, a 2-1 decision Tuesday that left the winners talking more seriously than ever about contending for a postseason spot.

Starting at shortstop for Brandon Crawford, who rested to nurse the aches and pains he sustained in his collision with left fielder Gorkys Hernandez, Alen Hanson drove in both San Francisco runs with two-out singles, including the hit that sent home the go-ahead run off Kenta Maeda with the score tied, 1-1, in the ninth.

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LOS ANGELES -- The Giants pulled themselves away from ringside to record their second final-at-bat victory over the Dodgers in two days, a 2-1 decision Tuesday that left the winners talking more seriously than ever about contending for a postseason spot.

Starting at shortstop for Brandon Crawford, who rested to nurse the aches and pains he sustained in his collision with left fielder Gorkys Hernandez, Alen Hanson drove in both San Francisco runs with two-out singles, including the hit that sent home the go-ahead run off Kenta Maeda with the score tied, 1-1, in the ninth.

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The Giants staged their rally two innings after their catcher, Nick Hundley, and Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig emptied both teams' dugouts and bullpens with a brief, physical skirmish at home plate. Fighting is nothing new to the Giants, who have clawed and scratched all season to stay on the fringes of postseason contention.

Video: SF@LAD: Puig, Hundley argue before fracas in LA

The Giants (61-60) climbed back above .500 and, in the process, heightened their anticipation for a strong stretch run. They still trail first-place Arizona by five games in the National League West standings, but they continued to pester the Dodgers, who lost their fifth consecutive game.

"We've always thought we were right in it," said left-hander Will Smith, who converted his third save opportunity in as many days.

Video: SF@LAD: Smith strikes out Muncy to record the save

Facing Maeda, Hanson kept in mind that Dodgers pitchers maintained the same approach to him all night. "They were throwing me off-speed stuff and fastballs late in the count," Hanson said through interpreter Erwin Higueros.

So after Maeda missed with a curveball and a changeup, Hanson knew he would get a fastball. He did, and ripped it into center field on a hop. Brandon Belt, activated from the disabled list shortly before the game began, raced home. That is, he ran as fast as he could for a man who had missed 17 games with an injured right leg.

"I kind of felt like I was running underwater," Belt said.

Fortunately for him and the Giants, the throw came home a little wide, allowing Belt to score.

Earlier, the Giants received an encouraging effort from Andrew Suarez, who shook off a brief slump to blank the Dodgers for six innings on just two hits.

Video: SF@LAD: Suarez strikes out 4 over 6 scoreless innings

Suarez left the bases loaded in the first inning when he coaxed Cody Bellinger's comebacker. That seemed to empower Suarez, who retired 15 of the final 17 batters he faced.

Suarez had looked somewhat dull lately, posting a 1-3 record with a 7.43 ERA while allowing seven home runs in his previous five starts. This time, the bite was back in his curveball and the life returned to his fastball.

Suarez attributed his improvement to a mechanical adjustment. "I stayed closed with my front shoulder. That helped me get on top of the ball and keep it down," he said.

Los Angeles had pulled even with two outs in the eighth against Sam Dyson as Justin Turner doubled and came home on Manny Machado's single.

Video: SF@LAD: Machado ties the game with a single in 8th

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Belt's ninth-inning single often would get overlooked. But not by the Giants. It followed Evan Longoria's leadoff single and thus gave the Giants momentum. It also was Belt's first at-bat after missing 17 games with a hyperextended right knee.

SOUND SMART
Hanson plays sporadically, but also effectively. In 15 games since July 27, he's batting .317 (13-for-41) with three runs, two doubles, two triples and seven RBIs.

Video: SF@LAD: Hanson plates Longoria on a single to center

UP NEXT
Derek Holland, the Giants' probable starter for Wednesday's 7:10 p.m. PT series finale at Los Angeles, has struggled against the Dodgers. The left-hander is 0-2 with a 6.08 ERA in three starts this year against Los Angeles. In two career starts at Dodger Stadium, he's 0-2 with a 4.50 ERA. Holland will be opposed by Dodgers lefty Hyun-Jin Ryu.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants, Alen Hanson, Andrew Suarez

Bochy playing it safe with Crawford post-collision

MLB.com @sfgiantsbeat

LOS ANGELES -- Opting to remain cautious, the Giants kept shortstop Brandon Crawford out of the lineup against the Dodgers on Tuesday, one day after he was shaken up in a collision with left fielder Gorkys Hernandez.

"He's feeling pretty good," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of Crawford, who absorbed a blow to the head from Hernandez's knee as they tumbled over each other while pursuing Clayton Kershaw's fourth-inning pop fly.

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LOS ANGELES -- Opting to remain cautious, the Giants kept shortstop Brandon Crawford out of the lineup against the Dodgers on Tuesday, one day after he was shaken up in a collision with left fielder Gorkys Hernandez.

"He's feeling pretty good," Giants manager Bruce Bochy said of Crawford, who absorbed a blow to the head from Hernandez's knee as they tumbled over each other while pursuing Clayton Kershaw's fourth-inning pop fly.

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Though Crawford appeared to have avoided serious injury, Bochy had no intention of starting him. Bochy was uncertain whether Crawford would be available to pinch-hit.

Dating back to 2006, when catcher Mike Matheny sustained a career-ending concussion from absorbing the impact of too many foul tips, the Giants have exercised extreme caution with players who might have the slightest hint of concussion symptoms.

Crawford, 31, has remained among the most durable Giants since he became their regular shortstop in 2012, averaging 148 games per season. Entering Tuesday, he had appeared in 115 of San Francisco's 120 games, second only to Andrew McCutchen's 116.

• As expected, the Giants activated first baseman Brandon Belt from the 10-day disabled list shortly before Tuesday's game. Right-hander Pierce Johnson was optioned to Triple-A Sacramento to clear roster room for Belt, who missed 17 games with a hyperextended right knee. San Francisco posted an 8-9 record in those games.

• According to Baseball Info Solutions, catcher Nick Hundley became the first Giant since 1958 to record a go-ahead hit against the Dodgers with San Francisco trailing in the ninth inning or later with the bases loaded and two outs.

Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

San Francisco Giants, Brandon Crawford