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Yanks deal Headley, Mitchell to SD for Blash

Trade allows more flexibility for further moves, as club seeks at least one starter
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The Yankees are continuing to make noise at the Winter Meetings, jumping on an opportunity to clear salary space for future moves by swapping third baseman Chase Headley and right-hander Bryan Mitchell to the Padres on Tuesday in exchange for outfielder Jabari Blash.

The Yankees also sent $500,000 to the Padres in the deal. San Diego is assuming the $13 million remaining on Headley's contract, which ends after the 2018 season. General manager Brian Cashman said that the deal will help the team add at least one starting pitcher while still keeping the team's 2018 payroll below the luxury tax threshold of $197 million.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The Yankees are continuing to make noise at the Winter Meetings, jumping on an opportunity to clear salary space for future moves by swapping third baseman Chase Headley and right-hander Bryan Mitchell to the Padres on Tuesday in exchange for outfielder Jabari Blash.

The Yankees also sent $500,000 to the Padres in the deal. San Diego is assuming the $13 million remaining on Headley's contract, which ends after the 2018 season. General manager Brian Cashman said that the deal will help the team add at least one starting pitcher while still keeping the team's 2018 payroll below the luxury tax threshold of $197 million.

With Blash, Yankees are absolutely filled with dingers

"We have more flexibility today than we had prior to this trade," Cashman said. "We did it with knowledge that we have some hungry, talented, inexperienced kids ready to prove that they can take that next step. At that same time, there might be some opportunities that exist by free agency or trade that could make us gravitate in a different direction. So we'll see."

New York has been connected to free agents Alex Cobb and CC Sabathia, while also exploring the trade market. The club has contacted the Tigers about right-hander Michael Fulmer, the 2016 American League Rookie of the Year, and is thought to have expressed interest in D-backs left-hander Patrick Corbin.

Video: Yanks rumored to be interested in trading for Fulmer

"We're trying. We're working real hard at it," manager Aaron Boone said. "I think it's something that we need to do, and we're trying to do. Hopefully, at some point we'll get a guy or two in the mix."

Hot Stove Tracker

The 28-year-old Blash is a career .200/.323/.336 hitter through two seasons with San Diego, hitting eight homers with 21 RBIs in 99 games. A right-handed hitter with power, Blash could be utilized as corner depth in the Yankees' outfield, having played 51 career games in right field and 22 games in left field.

Originally drafted by the Mariners in the eighth round in 2010, Blash has hit .260/.378/.513 with 140 home runs, 432 RBIs and 392 walks in 685 games over eight Minor League seasons. His 106 Minor League home runs over the past five seasons are tied for eighth most in the Minors in that span.

Video: SF@SD: Blash crushes tape-measure jack to left-center

The move reduces the Yankees' 40-man roster to 39 players and spells a return to San Diego for the 33-year-old Headley, who hit .273/.352/.406 with 12 homers and 61 RBIs in 147 games last season. Headley moved from third base to first base after Todd Frazier was acquired from the White Sox in July.

"He obviously had some big hits for us in the postseason," Cashman said. "I wish him the best of luck. High-character man, great family. San Diego obviously has had a lot of interest in Bryan Mitchell as well."

Tweet from @Yankees: Thanks for everything Chase and Bryan. We wish you guys the best of luck going forward! pic.twitter.com/5Kb5ricnvO

Mitchell, who turns 27 in April, was 1-1 with a 5.79 ERA in 20 games (one start) in the big leagues last year. A 16th-round pick by the Yankees in the 2009 Draft, scouts have raved about Mitchell's stuff, but he has had trouble remaining healthy.

Headley's departure could set up a reunion with Frazier, who is currently a free agent and hit .222/.365/.423 in 66 games for the Yankees. Cashman said on Tuesday that he has spoken with Frazier's agent, Brodie Van Wagenen. It is unclear if the Yankees would offer the multi-year commitment that Frazier covets.

Another option is Miguel Andujar, who is the team's No. 5 prospect according to MLBPipeline.com and played briefly at the big league level last season. The organization did seem to have some concerns about Andujar's developing defensive skills, although he's reputed to be an impact hitter.

"He's come a long way defensively," Cashman said. "He's worked extremely hard on it."

Video: NYY@CWS: Andujar drives in four in big league debut

The Yankees also have a hole at second base after dealing Starlin Castro to the Marlins in the Giancarlo Stanton trade. Cashman has named Thairo Estrada, Gleyber Torres, Ronald Torreyes and Tyler Wade as candidates for that vacancy, and some of those names could see time at third base as well.

"I'm certainly comfortable with the talent level that's about ready to go," Boone said. "Whether we give them some time kind of depends on what moves we make, or don't make, here in the coming months."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees, Jabari Blash, Chase Headley, Bryan Mitchell

For Boone, WM crash course in Yanks' style

New manager impressed with efficiency, embraces challenge of adapting to moves
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- As he walks the hallways of his first Winter Meetings as a big league manager, Aaron Boone said that he has been impressed by the efficiency that takes place behind the scenes in the Yankees' suites, where general manager Brian Cashman and his assistants are hard at work trying to upgrade the roster for the 2018 season.

"I think what's really stood out to me through this process and something that's exciting to me is, for being the New York Yankees, this is a very cohesive, stable situation," Boone said on Tuesday. "There's a lot of continuity within our front office right now, and I've gotten an inside look at it now these last few days."

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- As he walks the hallways of his first Winter Meetings as a big league manager, Aaron Boone said that he has been impressed by the efficiency that takes place behind the scenes in the Yankees' suites, where general manager Brian Cashman and his assistants are hard at work trying to upgrade the roster for the 2018 season.

"I think what's really stood out to me through this process and something that's exciting to me is, for being the New York Yankees, this is a very cohesive, stable situation," Boone said on Tuesday. "There's a lot of continuity within our front office right now, and I've gotten an inside look at it now these last few days."

Yanks deal Headley, Mitchell to SD for Blash

Boone said that he has been offered his opinions while the club has grabbed headlines through the first two days of the jewel event, completing significant trades on each afternoon, but the 44-year-old rookie skipper has also been doing a lot of listening.

Video: Boone on managing star-studded outfield

"One thing I'm learning these last few days is, there's a lot of smart people in that room," Boone said. "Frankly, it's been something that has been a lot of fun for me to be in these conversations in these rooms. I feel like it helps you grow in your knowledge of the game."

On the afternoon that Boone was introduced as the Yankees' manager last week, Giancarlo Stanton was still a member of the Marlins, who had separate trade agreements in place to ship the reigning National League MVP to the Cardinals or Giants. Boone's infield on that day included Starlin Castro and Chase Headley, and that all has now changed.

Video: Now a skipper, Boone reflects on family ties to MLB

"Sure, that catches you off guard, but you also understand it's the New York Yankees," Boone said. "We're going to do all we can to continue to improve the club. I know we're still working hard up in that room to try and tinker here and there, where we can to try and improve this team so we have a chance to play with the big boys this year."

Winter Meetings interview with Aaron Boone

While Cashman continues to seek starting pitching, the Yankees may move in free agency or the trade market to bolster their infield at second base or third base. A reunion with Todd Frazier remains possible, as Cashman said that he has made contact with the third baseman's agent, Brodie Van Wagenen.

"I'm a big fan of who he is as a player and who he is as a person," Boone said of Frazier.

Video: Aaron Boone on possibly bolstering pitching staff

Boone said that he is comfortable with the in-house infield options that exist to fill out his lineup, specifically mentioning that he is looking forward to watching top prospect Gleyber Torres in the spring. Boone has also done his part to help Cashman's efforts on the pitching front, reaching out to left-hander CC Sabathia.

Video: Boone discusses Gleyber Torres, top prospects

"I played with him in Cleveland for a couple of years," Boone said. "He's somebody that I have so much respect for and is obviously so important to the New York Yankees franchise. So I know we're going to have conversations with him. Whether it becomes a fit or not, we'll see in the coming days."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees

No rest for Cashman, Yanks after Stanton

GM stays active at Winter Meetings with Headley trade, pursuit of starter, infielders
MLB.com @feinsand

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Shortly after handing Giancarlo Stanton his new No. 27 pinstriped jersey Monday afternoon, general manager Brian Cashman made it clear the Yankees weren't done making moves.

"We have more work to do," Cashman said.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Shortly after handing Giancarlo Stanton his new No. 27 pinstriped jersey Monday afternoon, general manager Brian Cashman made it clear the Yankees weren't done making moves.

"We have more work to do," Cashman said.

It was reasonable to believe that work involved adding one more starting pitcher -- presumably CC Sabathia -- as the final significant piece of New York's offseason. Stanton figured to be the only major change to the roster that fell only one win shy of a World Series appearance, leaving little more than some fine-tuning to take care of between now and the start of Spring Training.

Cashman, an aggressive GM who is always trying to think three or four steps ahead, had other ideas.

On Tuesday, the Yankees shipped starting third baseman Chase Headley, right-hander Bryan Mitchell and $500,000 to the Padres for outfielder Jabari Blash, creating even more financial flexibility as they work to remain under the $197 million luxury-tax threshold.

Video: Rosenthal on Yankees trading Headley to Padres

The deal sheds another $12.5 million off the Yanks' current payroll, which stands at approximately $157 million when you factor in the expected raises for their eight arbitration-eligible players.

That leaves them $40 million shy of the threshold, meaning they could spend another $30 million and still have money to spare to use at next summer's non-waiver Trade Deadline.

Hot Stove Tracker

The trade also opened a spot at third base, creating two vacancies in the infield following Starlin Castro's departure in the Stanton deal.

According to sources, however, those openings don't appear to be the Yankees' top priority.

While the Yanks remain engaged with Sabathia, Cashman seems intent on acquiring a controllable starting pitcher along with another starter -- again, presumably Sabathia -- to join a rotation led by Luis Severino, Masahiro Tanaka and Sonny Gray. Lefty Jordan Montgomery is also in the rotation mix, though he has Minor League options and can begin the season at Triple-A as injury protection.

Detroit right-hander Michael Fulmer, the 2016 American League Rookie of the Year Award winner, is believed to be a potential target, according to a source. Fulmer has five years of club control remaining and won't become arbitration-eligible until 2019, making him an attractive option.

Video: Yanks rumored to be interested in trading for Fulmer

It would surely take a hefty package led by Clint Frazier and possibly Chance Adams -- New York's No. 2 prospect, according to MLBPipeline.com -- to land Fulmer, though Frazier appears to be expendable following the acquisition of Stanton, not to mention the emergence of Estevan Florial, the Yankees' No. 3 prospect.

Other potential trade targets include Pittsburgh's Gerrit Cole (two years of control), Arizona's Patrick Corbin (one year of control) and Kansas City's Danny Duffy (signed through 2021 for $60 million).

Then there are those two infield openings to address. Either spot could be filled by highly touted Gleyber Torres, MLBPipeline.com's No. 2 overall prospect in baseball. Cashman has said Torres would have a chance to make the team next spring, and that was before Castro was sent packing to Miami. Other internal options include Miguel Andujar (the team's No. 5 prospect) at third, and Ronald Torreyes or Tyler Wade at either position.

Video: Boone discusses Gleyber Torres, top prospects

Another possibility? Should the Yanks work out a trade for Fulmer, they could look to include second baseman Ian Kinsler in the deal. Kinsler is owed $10 million next season in the final year of his current deal, and it likely wouldn't take more than an additional mid-level prospect to acquire him.

The free-agent market also includes several options at second base, including Neil Walker and Eduardo Nunez, though both would likely require a two-year deal.

Todd Frazier could be the wild card in this whole thing, as the veteran slugger loved his brief stint in the Bronx last season, helping create a fun, loose culture in the clubhouse. The New Jersey native would love to return, though it's difficult to imagine the Yankees tying up third base for multiple years when Manny Machado is set to become a free agent next fall.

Video: Orioles rumored to be actively shopping Machado

Perhaps they'll just go all-in and try to get Machado now, though prying him away from owner Peter Angelos and the division-rival Orioles seems like an impossible task unless they're willing to part with the top three or four names in their system -- assuming that would even be enough. This option feels like a non-starter on both sides. The Yanks will have to wait until next year for their shot at Machado.

Then again, Stanton felt like the longest of long shots, too. Until he wasn't. He's a Yankee now, and although he can look at their roster now to begin learning who his new teammates are, he should probably wait another few weeks before committing those names to memory.

The Yankees aren't finished making big moves this offseason. Not even close.

Mark Feinsand, an executive reporter, originally joined MLB.com as a reporter in 2001.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees

Yanks have team season homer record in sights

With Stanton on board, stacked lineup poised to power past 1997 Mariners' mark
MLB.com @JPosnanski

Just about every baseball fan can tell you that Barry Bonds holds the single-season home run record with 73, though there will be those who will prefer to recognize Roger Maris' record of 61. There might even be a couple of baseball fans who still like to say that the real record is 60 set by Babe Ruth in a 154-game season.

Point is, baseball fans know that single-season homer record inside and out.

Just about every baseball fan can tell you that Barry Bonds holds the single-season home run record with 73, though there will be those who will prefer to recognize Roger Maris' record of 61. There might even be a couple of baseball fans who still like to say that the real record is 60 set by Babe Ruth in a 154-game season.

Point is, baseball fans know that single-season homer record inside and out.

Most baseball fans can probably tell you also that Bonds holds the career home run record with 762, though a substantial number of them might only recognize Henry Aaron's 755. Again, baseball fans know their homers.

But do you know, right off the top of your head, what team holds the record for most home runs in one season? I didn't. I had to look it up. The team that holds the record: the 1997 Mariners with 264 homers. I would not have guessed that. In fact, I don't think I would have been able to name any of the teams in the top five:

1. 1997 Mariners, 264
2. 2005 Rangers, 260
3. (tie) 2010 Blue Jays, 257
3. (tie) 1996 Orioles, 257
5. 2016 Orioles, 253

After this year, though, I suspect everyone will know the team home run record. That's because assuming everyone stays relatively healthy, the 2018 Yankees should blast all those marks to smithereens.

It can get pretty frightening to think about just how many home runs those Yankees will hit, with Giancarlo Stanton and Aaron Judge and the rest playing in the American League's best ballpark for homers. 

Stanton: Joining Yanks 'a great new chapter'

Let's look quickly at one possible Yanks starting lineup and make a few predictions. Let's look at a rough range of how many home runs the player might hit in 2018 -- for the range, I use some imagination but make sure the numbers average out to the general projections that you can find out there now.

1. Brett Gardner, LF
Prediction: 8 to 22 home runs (15 average)
Gardner hit a career-high 21 homers in 2017. That might come down a little, though Yankee Stadium is a wonderful home run ballpark for lefties, and Gardner has great bat control and might have developed an ability to back-spin baseballs out.

Video: NYY@BAL: Gardner jacks two homers against O's

2. Stanton, DH
Prediction: 35 to 65 (50 average)
It's a big range; well, with Stanton, it is more a question of health than anything else.

3. Judge, RF
Prediction: 21 to 53 (37 average)
The league has and will continue to adjust to Judge. He has and will continue to adjust back. Judge has, in his short career, looked both invincible and lost; he remains one of the more fascinating stories of 2018.

Video: Must C Combo: Judge hits 47th, 48th homers of season

4. Gary Sanchez, C
Prediction: 20 to 42 (31 average)
Sanchez's power is basically unlimited, but there is a question of playing time. He can only play so many games as a catcher. Sanchez hit 33 homers in 122 games last year.

5. Didi Gregorius, SS
Prediction: 12 to 28 (20 average)
Remember when the question was whether Gregorius would hit at all? There were times when he was the Yankees' best hitter last season, even with the year Judge had.

6. Greg Bird, 1B
Prediction: 10 to 36 (23 average)
Bird is the biggest wildcard on the team. If he can stay healthy and make enough contact, the power is overwhelming; he slugged .551 in the last month of the season and hit three homers in the postseason. But Bird has to prove he can do it over a full season.

Video: Judge, Sanchez, Bird deliver historic postseason HRs

7. Aaron Hicks, CF
Prediction: 8 to 28 (18 average)
Hicks hit 15 homers in roughly a half season last year. Can he stay healthy for a full season?

8. Todd Frazier, 3B
Prediction: 18 to 38 (28 average)
Frazier is a free agent who has not re-signed with the Yanks. But with Chase Headley now gone to the Padres, maybe Frazier comes back. We'll put him in as a placeholder.

9. Gleyber Torres, 2B
Prediction: 4 to 16 (10 average)
Torres will be given every chance to win a job at Spring Training and be like Derek Jeter for the 1996 Yankees -- a mega-prospect who will be asked to play good defense and whatever he does offensively will be a bonus.

The home runs ranges are, as you can tell, pretty large. At the low end, if basically everything went wrong, this lineup would hit just 136 homers -- which is two fewer than the Red Sox's regular starters hit in 2017. At the high end, this lineup -- just the Yanks' nine regulars -- would hit a ridiculous 328 home runs, smashing the home run record by more than 60 all by themselves.

And then there's the likely middle -- some regression from Judge and Stanton, nobody really breaks out -- and then the projection is this lineup would hit approximately 232 homers. Add in some home runs off the bench, and the Yankees would have a great chance to break the homer record. There simply has never been a home run lineup like this ever put together before.

Video: Hal Steinbrenner on Stanton joining the Yankees

There are other home runs things to watch. Only one pair of teammates -- Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle in 1961 -- have each hit 50 homers in a season. Judge and Stanton could do that. 

Then there's the story of right-handed power. The 2015 Blue Jays hit more home runs from the right side (200) than any team in baseball history. This was built around Josh Donaldson (41), Jose Bautista (40) and Edwin Encarnacion (39) -- that's 120 homers from three guys. Will Stanton, Judge and Sanchez hit more than that? I'd say there's a pretty good chance.

Which leads, finally, to a funny comment from new Yankees manager Aaron Boone. You want to talk about a charmed guy -- Boone's first manager's job after years in the television booth is with the Yanks just as they are coming into their own. On what was basically his first day, he got the news that they're getting Stanton. Boone talked about how much fun he has had playing around with the lineup already; he hasn't made any decisions but has told Stanton, "I"m thinking you will be in the top four."

• Lineup luxury: Yankees rich with possibilities

Anyway, I asked Boone what he would do with those three incredible right-handed hitters. Would he split them up with lefties like Bird and Gregorius? Would hit hit them all in a row?

"I might split them up," Boone said. And then he smiled.

"But you know what," he said. "I might not. I mean, I don't have to."

There are no wrong answers with this Yankees lineup.

Joe Posnanski is a columnist for MLB.com.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees, Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton

With addition of Blash, Yanks are filled with HRs

The Yankees started the offseason with a lineup that featured Aaron Judge (52 HR, .627 SLG), Gary Sanchez (33 HR, .531 SLG), Didi Gregorius (25 HR, .478 SLG) and Greg Bird. (9 HR, .422 SLG in 48 games). There were already a lot of dingers on this team. 

They then acquired Giancarlo Stanton (59 HRs, .631 SLG) putting baseball's two home run leaders in one outfield. That alone terrified every pitcher and those with a fear of things falling from the sky. 

But, the team hasn't stopped its pursuit of sluggers:

Alex Rodriguez met Bruce Springsteen and their photo together featured some big smiles

Bruce Springsteen is currently enjoying a run on Broadway, playing five nights a week and delivering -- in his customary manner -- a performance of music and storytelling. 

On Tuesday night, the crowd featured at least one very special guest in Alex Rodriguez, who met up backstage with The Boss after the show for this very smiley (and fashionable) photo. 

Winter Meetings interview with Aaron Boone

MLB.com

Q. Aaron, can you talk about what your dad has mentioned as far as what you've learned?

AARON BOONE: I would say he's been the biggest influence on me in my life, just as a person, as a man, as a ballplayer, now as I go into this role. So he's always somebody that, you know, that I seek wisdom from, that has always poured into me. We've always had a very close relationship since growing up.

Q. Aaron, can you talk about what your dad has mentioned as far as what you've learned?

AARON BOONE: I would say he's been the biggest influence on me in my life, just as a person, as a man, as a ballplayer, now as I go into this role. So he's always somebody that, you know, that I seek wisdom from, that has always poured into me. We've always had a very close relationship since growing up.

So I'm sure, like many people out there, he's my dad and someone that I look up to and really admire. He'll be someone that I always confide in and certainly seek out his advice.

Q. He said he got very emotional when you told him you're going to be the manager of the Yankees. He cries a lot.

AARON BOONE: He's starting to cry in his old age a lot more. When I told him, laughter turned into some tears. He's, I think, pretty excited, obviously, for this opportunity.

Q. Any advice from him that he helped you with so far?

AARON BOONE: No. He'll get -- he and my mom will come over at Christmastime, and I know he's going to want to sit me down on the couch and give some words of wisdom about things that are important to him. I'll take in all advice and filter some of it, like I do with everyone else.

Q. Aaron, looking at second and third, would you be comfortable with two kids?

AARON BOONE: Obviously, that's something we're still working on here is addressing issues we still have on our roster. I'm very comfortable with who we have in our system and the depth that we built up in the system and guys that are, frankly, either knocking on the door or ready to play major roles from the start. We'll just have to kind of see how the next couple months play out. There's still time between now and then.

I'm certainly comfortable with the talent level that's about ready to go. Whether we give them some time kind of depends on what moves we make or don't make here in the coming months.

Q. What do you know about Gleyber Torres?

AARON BOONE: Just really excited to be around -- I think what's exciting about our team is obviously just the young talent that's there, the passion that these guys play with. But as I've talked a lot about, these are real high character guys, guys you want to be around, guys that are going to impact our clubhouse in a positive way.

All accounts on Gleyber is he's that guy. Whether he's impacting our club from jump street, again, remains to be seen. But I'm really excited about his long-term future with us. He's another in the long line of, we think, special players for us at some point.

Q. Have you had a chance to talk to him at some point?

AARON BOONE: I have not. I think he went back to Venezuela yesterday, and I texted with him today, but I have not heard from him. I think he'll be back early next month down in Tampa. I hope to see him down there.

Q. What was it about Cashman -- I mean, he had to hire you, but you also had to accept and feel a comfort level there. What was it about Brian and the way he described the team moving forward that you felt so comfortable with?

AARON BOONE: I think one of the things that I think most of you guys appreciate about Brian is the same for me, and that's how direct he is. How honest he is. Obviously, his reputation and his track record in the game, I think, speaks for itself. The longevity he's had.

And I think what's really stood out to me through this process and something that's exciting to me is, for being the New York Yankees, this is a very cohesive, stable situation. There's a lot of continuity within our front office right now, and I've gotten an inside look at it now these last few days. And certainly being here in our meetings, just how efficient I feel like things are run and kind of the loyalty that exists across the board in our room.

Q. Aaron, are you looking forward to the Red Sox rivalry again? What do you think the reaction might be to you, seeing you in a Yankee uniform again?

AARON BOONE: Of course I'm looking forward to it. Obviously, it's a team, it's an organization that we have a lot of respect for. Obviously, they're going to have another great team this year. I know Alex really well now, so us getting this opportunity is something I think we're both looking forward to.

But, yeah, that -- when you can play impactful games -- and hopefully we are playing impactful games against them late in the season -- that's always something you look forward to, to be able to play on these kinds of stages is why you do it.

Q. Sanchez will be in New York. Are you staying around to talk to him?

AARON BOONE: Yeah, he should be in New York this weekend. We've been texting back and forth, and my plan, my hope is to get together with him very casually at some point this weekend. Again, I've talked to you guys a lot about relationships, and obviously, my relationship with Gary is something that I put a real high value on.

Q. What do you most want to impress upon him while you're trying to build that relationship?

AARON BOONE: Right now just getting to know each other. Look, catcher in Major League Baseball, it's a demanding position. It's such an important position, and it's a chance to impact like no other position on the field with things that don't necessarily show up in the stat column. Obviously, he's a tremendous talent. He's already had massive success as a young player. So just building that relationship, gaining that trust, and letting him know that he's going to be very well supported by me and our coaching staff. That relationship has already hopefully started.

Q. Aaron, you inherited Larry Rothschild, who's obviously had a lot of experience. How are you going to let him handle pitching? How involved are you going to be in, say, pitching changes? Is it going to be all his call? Is he going to recommend to you how to handle it?

AARON BOONE: I'll be involved -- look, with all my coaches, I don't see myself being a guy that micromanages situations. Obviously, they'll report to me and let me know what's going on with whatever things that they're coaching, but I would say Larry and my relationship will be a strong one. It will obviously be an important one. And somebody that I'll lean on heavily when it comes to making decisions about pitching changes.

I mean, in the end, those decisions are mine, but Larry is somebody that I'm going to lean on heavily, rely on heavily, and somebody that I already, going into this, have a ton of respect for.

Q. Aaron, when you took the job, you didn't have Stanton. You had Castro and had Lee. Are you surprised at how quickly this has all changed?

AARON BOONE: Look, any time you wake up and not sure that we were necessarily in on Stanton, how quick it kind of came together and Brian was able to pivot when it became a reality, sure, that catches you off guard. But you also understand it's the New York Yankees, and we're going to do all we can to continue to improve the club.

So these things, when you take a step back, are surprising, but certainly they're exciting. And I know we're still working hard up in that room to try and tinker here and there where we can to try and improve this team so we have a chance to play with the big boys this year.

Q. Aaron, when you look at your outfield, Judge and Stanton, and you have three or four other guys who can be starters, how do you as a manager impact them so it doesn't become a big deal that who's in right field, who's a DH, who's all that kind of stuff?

AARON BOONE: Well, that's another thing that starts with the relationship. I think early returns are -- obviously this has happened quick these last 48 hours with Giancarlo joining, but there seems to be a lot of buy-in from these guys, and that's going to be important because there is going to have to be some flexibility.

One of the things we'll try and flush out in Spring Training is who makes the most sense. Who's maybe the most capable of moving to a different position? I think the one thing we're talking about with these, whether it's Gardy, Hicksy, Jacoby, and obviously Giancarlo and Aaron Judge is, these are all two-way players. These are guys that are talented on the defensive side of the ball, but I also think it will allow us to kind of use that DH to get guys off their feet, to get kind of rest, but also keep these guys in the lineup on a regular basis depending on matchups.

Q. Aaron, how big of a necessity is it in your eyes for you guys to add another starter?

AARON BOONE: We're trying. We're working real hard at it. I think it's something that we need to do, and we're trying to do. Hopefully, at some point we'll get a guy or two in the mix. But you also look at the depth in the farm system and guys knocking on the door. So we do feel like we're in a pretty strong position whichever which we go, but I know we're working hard to try to add where we can.

Q. I know on the day you were introduced on the radio, I think you said you wanted CC to come back or would like CC to come back. Have you been part of that outreach?

AARON BOONE: CC is one of the guys I reached out to early in this job mostly because I've had a relationship with him for a long time. I played with him in Cleveland for a couple of years. He's somebody that I have so much respect for and is obviously so important to the New York Yankees franchise. So I know we're going to have conversations with him. Whether it becomes a fit or not, we'll see in the coming days.

Q. Aaron, when you were looking from the outside, what was your impression of Tom Frazier?

AARON BOONE: Another guy that I have a little bit of a relationship. Obviously, we've kind of had a similar track in Cincinnati and then playing in New York. And I thought not only did it bring a lot to the table, obviously, for the Yankees last year as they were in the pennant race, just from a presence and obviously the power and the stability that he brings to third base, but also the kind of person he is. So I'm a big fan of who he is as a player and who he is as a person.

Q. Aaron, did you have a chance to talk to Ellsbury, communicate with him since the Stanton trade, see where he fits into all this?

AARON BOONE: I have not since the Stanton trade. Jacoby is another guy I know pretty well. He lives in Arizona. I live in Arizona. I usually see him, before I became manager of the Yankees, once or twice in the off-season. So these are conversations that we'll have over the coming days and weeks in the roster and see how different moves come to your club.

Q. Ryan is talking about coming back to Spring Training to bring back his job. Here's a guy who makes a lot of money. How difficult is that going to be as a manager?

AARON BOONE: Obviously, we have a lot of confidence in our outfield. We have a lot of, frankly, great players in the outfield. So, yeah, there are going to be some tough calls. Some of the guys aren't going to get to play maybe as much as they maybe would want to certainly. But that's just the reality of the situation. And because of the fact that we've made some of the moves that's put us in a position of strength right now, especially when you look at the outfield.

Q. Given the timing when you came in, how much of a voice or input do you think you have in a plan that was already set in place in the summer and the fall?

AARON BOONE: Well, look, right now what's going on as far as the Winter Meetings and when you talk about roster construction, I think I'm certainly part of the conversation, and I think they value my opinion now. I think that's why I'm in this chair.

But certain decisions, when it comes to acquisitions and different deals we might make, I think they value my opinion, but it's just that. These are decisions obviously being made by Brian, our scouting, analytics staff all getting together.

But I'm a voice in that room, and hopefully one that's earning a trusted voice.

Q. Aside from anything that your dad might have imparted on you, what's the best piece of advice you've gotten since taking over the job? Who gave you that?

AARON BOONE: I don't know if I can be real specific. I've talked to a number of -- Jim Leyland reached out to me. We had a really good conversation. I'm not going to share everything he told me. Mostly he's a little more colorful when he talks to you behind the scenes.

I had a great meeting with Joe Torre yesterday morning for a good while, and there was a lot of great advice that he imparted on me.

I feel like those are two guys for me that at different times in the year, I expect to reach out to them and bounce things off them and kind of look to them for some advice, especially as things come up that I haven't dealt with yet.

Q. Is there one nugget that either of those guys gave you, whether it's a broad philosophical thing that sort of sticks out?

AARON BOONE: Don't read the papers.

Q. Aaron, you mentioned a couple of coaching decisions yesterday. Any more on the staff?

AARON BOONE: We did add Carlos Mendoza to the staff. That got done today. He's going to be our infield coach, quality control. Expect to have him on the bench. Another guy that I'm really excited about adding to our staff. This is a guy that's impacted a lot of guys in our -- not only our minor league system, but guys that have now gotten to the big leagues. This is, I think, a rising star in our industry. I've gotten to get to know him a lot better these last couple days. Look, it's another guy that I think is going to really impact the Yankees in a profound way, especially when it comes to infielders this year.

Q. Aaron, what's it like to follow Torre and Girardi with their success and longevity?

AARON BOONE: First of all, it's two guys that I have a ton of respect for. Obviously, in Joe Torre, I got a chance to play for him. So I think it's one of those things that speaks to the success of this franchise, to the stability that I talked about earlier with Brian Cashman and this organization and the Steinbrenner family. The fact that for such a major club, that there's been two managers in, what, 22 whatever years it's been.

I guess in a way it's big shoes to fill, but I don't look at it as necessarily following anyone. Frankly, the position we're in as a club and the positive position we are in as a club, some of that has to do with how good Joe Torre was and how good Joe Girardi were at their jobs. They've allowed me to come into a situation that's really stable, and a lot of it is because of the efforts that they've contributed to this organization.

Q. Ohtani went to the west coast but still stayed in the same league. I know you guys are going to face him the first month of the season. How do you, like, plan to prepare to face him? What are the challenges?

AARON BOONE: Well, hopefully at that point when we do face him, obviously, there will be video, and the prep work we'll do from an analytics standpoint, from a video standpoint, from a scouting standpoint will just be like any other player of as we prepare for each individual series depending on who we're facing, we'll take all that information. Whether we're facing them on the mound or in the box, it will all be part of our game plan.

Q. Aaron, you mentioned being a voice in that room. I'm wondering whether, as a first-time manager and a younger guy, you're more comfortable with that notion of listening to several different sources of input, analytics and the like, as opposed to maybe somebody who's been a manager for quite a while who's maybe more standard.

AARON BOONE: I enjoy being in the room, and I do a lot of listening when I'm in there right now because, in very short order, some guys I've had a relationship with, but in a lot of cases, I'm getting to know guys as well.

And one thing I'm learning these last few days is there's a lot of smart people in that room. So whereas I'm not afraid to speak up and give my opinion when asked and contribute to the conversations, I'm also doing a lot of listening right now, a lot of learning right now.

And frankly, it's been something that has been a lot of fun for me to be in these conversations in these rooms. I feel like it helps you grow in your knowledge of the game.

Q. How much have you seen the role change from when your dad was managing to what it is now?

AARON BOONE: It's changed a lot. I mean, the game's changed a lot. There's a lot of similarities. I mean, at the end of the day, you're in this seat, you're making quick decisions. I think it's important to be decisive in the decisions you're making, and it still comes down to relationships are a very important part of this game, of frankly whatever avenue you are in life. Relationships play a strong role. That's true today, as it was 20 years ago, as it was 50 years ago.

Q. So people wonder, like, balancing those relationships, when you're making those decisions with the metrics, which tend to be black and white.

AARON BOONE: That's my job. It's to be prepared to have all the information readily available, the ability to decipher it, and then the ability to apply it within a game, within the course of the game, within the game plan, and make a decision that's best for our club.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees

Showalter cracks joke about new-look Yankees

The talk of baseball this week has been the Yankees, who acquired human home run-machine Giancarlo Stanton and added him to an already-powerful lineup headlined by Aaron Judge and Gary Sanchez (and, now, Jabari Blash). 

This presents a daunting task for pitching staffs around the entire league, but it's even more of a concern for the rest of the AL East. Orioles manager Buck Showalter, whose club will have to deal with that video game-like lineup a whole bunch of times next season, was asked about how his team will approach that stable of dangerous hitters. 

Stanton: Joining Yanks 'a great new chapter'

Yankees introduce slugger at Winter Meetings
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Giancarlo Stanton pinched at the shoulders of a pinstriped jersey with his No. 27 stitched on the back, holding it up for public consumption while a broad grin spread across his face. It might soon constitute a nightmare for American League pitchers, but this was the outcome the slugger had dreamed of, being introduced as the newest member of the Yankees' imposing lineup.

Stanton tried on his new uniform top for the first time on Monday afternoon as the Yankees interrupted the relative quiet of the Winter Meetings' first day to show off their prized acquisition. Flanked by managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner, general manager Brian Cashman and manager Aaron Boone, Stanton is the first reigning Most Valuable Player Award winner to be traded since Alex Rodriguez landed in New York prior to the 2004 season.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Giancarlo Stanton pinched at the shoulders of a pinstriped jersey with his No. 27 stitched on the back, holding it up for public consumption while a broad grin spread across his face. It might soon constitute a nightmare for American League pitchers, but this was the outcome the slugger had dreamed of, being introduced as the newest member of the Yankees' imposing lineup.

Stanton tried on his new uniform top for the first time on Monday afternoon as the Yankees interrupted the relative quiet of the Winter Meetings' first day to show off their prized acquisition. Flanked by managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner, general manager Brian Cashman and manager Aaron Boone, Stanton is the first reigning Most Valuable Player Award winner to be traded since Alex Rodriguez landed in New York prior to the 2004 season.

Get your Stanton jersey

"I'm glad to be here and part of the New York Yankees. It's going to be a great new chapter in my life and my career," Stanton said. "I think it's going to be a fun new dynamic, but at the same time, it's baseball. So I understand there will be some ups and downs, and I'll have to deal with that on a bigger scale. But it's the same game I played down in Miami -- just a bigger scale, brighter lights."

Video: Stanton on why he decided to join the Yankees

Three months removed from a season in which he led the Majors in home runs (59), RBIs (132) and slugging percentage (.631), the 28-year-old Stanton was acquired from the Marlins with cash considerations in exchange for second baseman Starlin Castro and a pair of Minor League prospects: right-handed pitcher Jorge Guzman and infielder Jose Devers.

Stanton's Winter Meetings news conference

Though a big-swinging outfielder hadn't been on the shopping list, Cashman said that he touched base with Miami during the General Managers Meetings. Those talks picked up steam after Shohei Ohtani eliminated the Yankees from competition for his services, but Cashman had doubts that the Yanks could land Stanton when the Cardinals and Giants worked out separate trade agreements with the Marlins.

"Maybe Wednesday of last week, I thought it was not going to happen," Cashman said. "They had already cut deals, which is very public, with two other franchises. But nothing had been consummated in terms of approval."

Video: Stanton on if he ever thought he could play for Yanks

Stanton said that he was told that if he did not approve the trade, he would remain a Marlin for life, a statement that frayed what had become a testy relationship with the organization that drafted him in 2007. He declined to waive his no-trade clause for both St. Louis and San Francisco, effectively calling the Marlins' bluff.

"You can't say that and expect me to jump at what's there if that's not the right situation for me," Stanton said.

Apprised of the developments, Steinbrenner authorized the trade, in which the Yankees will assume $265 million of the $295 million remaining on Stanton's contract over the next 10 seasons.

"I've always said New York's a marquee town, and I think it's important to have some marquee players," Steinbrenner said. "But more important than that, I think it's important to have veteran players that could be mentors for the young kids. We've got a lot of young kids, and they all have things to learn, even at this level."

Despite Stanton's massive salary, which will count for about $22 million toward the Yankees' upcoming luxury tax bill, Steinbrenner said that there is still a path for the Yanks to reset their penalty rate by fielding a payroll below $197 million.

Video: Cashman on staying under luxury tax, making deals

"I always said that is absolutely my goal, but again, my main goal is to field a championship-caliber team -- which I do believe we have," Steinbrenner said.

For Stanton, the chief concern was having the opportunity to play for a winning club, leaving the 77-win Marlins as they prepare to enter a rebuilding phase. Stanton told Miami that he would approve trades to only the Astros, Cubs, Dodgers and Yankees.

"They're winners," Stanton said. "They're young and they're in a good position to win for a long time, and I lost for a long time. So I want to change that dynamic and be a winner."

Video: Stanton on Marlins' move to rebuild leading to deal

Though Stanton's contract permits him to opt out following the 2020 season, agent Joel Wolfe said his client intends to stay in New York through the entire deal, which expires after the '28 season.

"He wants to be sure, because this is probably it," Wolfe said. "He has no desire to opt out. We fought for that. It was meant to be a shield, not a sword. We're not planning to use it just to get more money. That's been taken care of. It's an escape clause in the event it's not working out."

Cashman said that as talks progressed, he called AL Rookie of the Year Award winner and AL MVP Award runner-up Aaron Judge to explain what was happening and to lay out one potential way a rotation could work, with Judge and Stanton both seeing time in right field and at designated hitter.

Video: Stanton on how joining Judge will make both better

"He said, 'Hey, I'm pumped. This is exciting. If could you pull that off that would be amazing,'" Cashman said. "I didn't talk about who we would be giving up, so he didn't know that aspect. But I did want to reach out to him and get a feel from his perspective, and I was excited even more so by his response."

Video: Boone discusses Yankees' lineup with Stanton in it

With Stanton and Judge (52 homers in 2017), the Yankees will be just the second team ever to have two players who hit 50 or more homers the previous season, a feat accomplished after Roger Maris (61) and Mickey Mantle (54) enjoyed a memorable summer of 1961 in the heart of the Yanks' lineup.

"He obviously brings a whole new dimension," Steinbrenner said. "He's a league MVP and a really good guy, and it's going to be exciting. He's going to produce some runs for us, and seeing him and Judge and Sanchez and [Greg] Bird and Didi [Gregorius], it's going to be exciting for our fans. They're excited."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees, Giancarlo Stanton

Lineup luxury: Yankees rich with possibilities

Stanton, Judge both open to DH, bouncing around OF to maximize potential
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- As the dream of installing Giancarlo Stanton into the heart of the Yankees' lineup started to look more like reality, general manager Brian Cashman placed a telephone call to Aaron Judge, giving the American League Rookie of the Year a behind-the-scenes update on the negotiations taking place with the Marlins.

Cashman likened the chat to floating a weather balloon toward one of his young team leaders, explaining how a potential rotation could work with Stanton and both spending time in right field and at designated hitter. He also suggested that one or both of the sluggers might see some reps in left field, where Cashman said Brett Gardner will start.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- As the dream of installing Giancarlo Stanton into the heart of the Yankees' lineup started to look more like reality, general manager Brian Cashman placed a telephone call to Aaron Judge, giving the American League Rookie of the Year a behind-the-scenes update on the negotiations taking place with the Marlins.

Cashman likened the chat to floating a weather balloon toward one of his young team leaders, explaining how a potential rotation could work with Stanton and both spending time in right field and at designated hitter. He also suggested that one or both of the sluggers might see some reps in left field, where Cashman said Brett Gardner will start.

"His response was, 'Cash, we're going to do everything we can to win,' and that's going to make it easier in that matter," Cashman said. "He said, 'Hey, I'm pumped. This is exciting. If you could pull that off, that would be amazing.' I did want to reach out to him and get a feel from his perspective, and I was excited even more so by his response."

Video: Fantasy 411 on Stanton's fantasy impact on Judge

Meanwhile, when new manager Aaron Boone exited Cashman's office late last week, he did so while sketching out potential batting orders in his mind. Days later, Boone's enthusiasm had not dimmed about the possibility of slotting Stanton, Judge and Gary Sanchez in his Opening Day lineup -- perhaps even back-to-back-to-back, he said.

"Absolutely, you can," Boone said. "That will be one of those things that we flesh out. What's Greg Bird's continued development? What is the matchup? Do we feel like we want one of those lefties breaking those three guys up? It's something that is a possibility, but I would have no reservation if we feel like it's best to string those three dudes together. I think we would be all right."

Stanton: Joining Yanks 'a great new chapter'

On many occasions, Boone could also opt to use the left-handed-hitting Bird and Didi Gregorius to break up his right-handed muscle, with switch-hitters Chase Headley and Aaron Hicks offering additional flexibility.

Cashman said that the Yankees were not prepared to name a second baseman to replace Starlin Castro on this December afternoon, but listed Thairo Estrada, Gleyber Torres, Ronald Torreyes and Tyler Wade as in-house choices. Here's how one possible Yankees order could look:

Gardner -- LF
Judge -- RF
Stanton -- DH
Sanchez -- C
Bird -- 1B
Gregorius -- SS
Hicks -- CF
Headley -- 3B
Torres -- 2B

Video: Hal Steinbrenner on Stanton joining the Yankees

Given Yankee Stadium's expansive left field, it seems most likely that Stanton and Judge would play most of their defensive innings in right field. Stanton has played 942 big league games in right field, one in center field and none in left field. He has been the DH 13 times.

"I'm fine with it," Stanton said. "I can bounce around. Wherever they need me, I'm OK with that. I always liked DHing when we played the AL teams in previous years."

Video: Fantasy 411 on Stanton's value in pinstripes

Judge has played right field in 168 big league games and has not appeared in left field or center field, though as the Yankees recently reminded Boone, Judge was drafted as a center fielder out of Fresno State University. Judge has also DHed 11 times for New York.

"It's a really good problem that we have," Boone said. "I think the one thing that makes it workable is both Giancarlo and Aaron, the two guys that obviously play the same position, are great people. I think they're open to doing what we need to do to make this the best we can."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees, Aaron Judge, Giancarlo Stanton

Yanks, Cashman agree to contract extension

General manager's deal is reportedly worth $25 million over five years
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The bigger headlines will belong to new slugger Giancarlo Stanton, and deservedly so, but the architect of this refreshed Yankees roster has also been rewarded as the Winter Meetings began Monday.

After overseeing a 91-win campaign in which the Yankees finished within one victory of the World Series, general manager Brian Cashman has agreed to a five-year extension that will reportedly be worth $25 million.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- The bigger headlines will belong to new slugger Giancarlo Stanton, and deservedly so, but the architect of this refreshed Yankees roster has also been rewarded as the Winter Meetings began Monday.

After overseeing a 91-win campaign in which the Yankees finished within one victory of the World Series, general manager Brian Cashman has agreed to a five-year extension that will reportedly be worth $25 million.

The Yankees have not made an official announcement, but managing general partner Hal Steinbrenner confirmed that an agreement is in place with Cashman, who has served as the team's GM since February 1998 and is currently the longest-tenured GM in the sport.

Video: Cashman on how deal for Stanton came together

"Without getting into specifics, yes, Cashman is going to stay," Steinbrenner said. "I want him to stay, and he's going to stay."

Though Cashman's contract expired on Oct. 31, Steinbrenner has said that a new agreement was in the process of being negotiated.

The reported figures represent a raise from Cashman's most recent contract, which is believed to have been worth approximately $9 million over three years. His new deal puts Cashman near the top tier of baseball executives, just below the Dodgers' Andrew Friedman and the Cubs' Theo Epstein, among few others.

"I'm glad that I'm staying," Cashman said. "We haven't dotted i's and crossed t's. I haven't signed anything yet, but we have pre-agreed to get something done -- and the numbers aren't necessarily accurate, but I don't really care about any of that stuff either."

Video: Cashman on staying under luxury tax, making deals

When the team decided to part with manager Joe Girardi following the American League Championship Series, Cashman told Steinbrenner that he was comfortable prioritizing the pursuit of a new manager and filling out the coaching staff, rather than his own contract situation.

The Yanks completed that search last week, introducing Aaron Boone as the 33rd manager in franchise history on Wednesday at Yankee Stadium. The Yankees have won four World Series championships and six AL pennants under Cashman's tenure.

"I wasn't intending to go anywhere, never had an interest in going anywhere," Cashman said. "So I had told Hal straight up, like, 'Listen, let's just try to work through this and get it behind us, because I have no intent of jumping ship.'"

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees

Bard bench coach as Yanks' staff takes shape

Nevin (third base), Willits (first base) also named as instructors; Rothschild returns to pitching helm
MLB.com @BryanHoch

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Most of the Yankees' coaching staff has been filled out, as new manager Aaron Boone will welcome bench coach Josh Bard, third-base coach Phil Nevin and first-base coach Reggie Willits to the dugout in 2018, along with returning pitching coach Larry Rothschild.

The Yankees' hitting coach and bullpen coach remain unsettled, and Boone said that those positions could be announced shortly. Alan Cockrell and Marcus Thames served as the team's hitting coaches last season under former manager Joe Girardi, while Mike Harkey served as the bullpen coach.

LAKE BUENA VISTA, Fla. -- Most of the Yankees' coaching staff has been filled out, as new manager Aaron Boone will welcome bench coach Josh Bard, third-base coach Phil Nevin and first-base coach Reggie Willits to the dugout in 2018, along with returning pitching coach Larry Rothschild.

The Yankees' hitting coach and bullpen coach remain unsettled, and Boone said that those positions could be announced shortly. Alan Cockrell and Marcus Thames served as the team's hitting coaches last season under former manager Joe Girardi, while Mike Harkey served as the bullpen coach.

Bard, 39, was a teammate of Boone's with the Indians in 2005. He spent the last two seasons as the Dodgers' bullpen coach, following three years as a scout and special assistant in the team's front office. Bard played parts of 10 seasons as a Major League catcher with the Indians, Red Sox, Padres, Nationals and Mariners.

Video: Boone discusses offseason plans after Stanton

Bard could also assume instruction of the Yankees' catchers, a role that could be magnified given Gary Sanchez's struggles behind the plate in 2017.

Nevin, 46, spent last season as the Giants' third-base coach after managing at Triple-A Reno from 2014-16. A 2001 National League All-Star infielder, Nevin played 12 seasons in the Majors with the Astros, Tigers, Angels, Padres, Rangers, Cubs and Twins. He and Boone's older brother, Bret, attended the same high school.

"It was easy for me. Those were two guys that I had kind of in my mind as guys that I would want in those roles," Boone said of Bard and Nevin. "They went through a pretty extensive interview process, and I'm excited about those two guys -- very different personalities, but two guys that I think are going to have a big-time impact on our team."

Willits, 36, has been a highly regarded outfield and baserunning instructor in the Yankees' system following a playing career that included six big league seasons with the Angels from 2006-11.

The New York Post has reported that Carlos Mendoza will be named as the Yankees' infield coach, and that Thames and Harkey are expected to return. Boone said on Monday that there will be a Spanish-speaking presence on the staff, which Mendoza would fulfill. 

"I don't think there will be a lot of surprises," Boone said. "I've seen some of the names out there. We're excited to bring back a couple guys, and hopefully add a couple more guys that are going to really have an impact on a young roster."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch and on Facebook.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

New York Yankees